HOW to SURVIVE an AIRCRASH

 
This video shows how you can survive an airplane crash.
 
In case you are caught up in an air disaster situation, this is what you need:

  • an aisle seat or one close to it
  • long-sleeved pants and top;
  • and flat closed-toe shoes;
  • and a smoke hood or a wet washcloth

 
Click on the video hereafter:
 


 
If you need the transcript, it is available here: http://goo.gl/31kRo
 

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ICAO Language Proficiency Rating Scale – Grille de niveaux de langues (anglais OACI)

Référentiel fixant les niveaux OACI par compétences.

Cliquer sur le document « Echelle d’évaluation des compétences linguistiques » de la DGAC ci-dessous:

http://www.ecologique-solidaire.gouv.fr/sites/default/files/grilleNotation_AESA.pdf

Attention, l’existence de mises à jour concernant ces documents est possible. Il convient dès lors de rechercher des compléments d’information auprès de votre administration ou auprès des autorités compétentes (la DGAC pour la France et surtout l’OACI).

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HOLDING PATTERN & TEARDROP ENTRY REMARKABLY EXPLAINED

A holding pattern is nothing more than a big oval formed in a race-track shape that is designed to keep an aircraft in a specified space for a specified amount of time. A holding pattern can be published on either airway charts or terminal charts or can be unpublished, and specified by the air traffic controller. Watch the video (from 1’49 »):

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ICAO Air Traffic Radiotelephony – Transmitting Numbers

Here is an audio/video file with transcript about how the numbers must be pronounced according to the ICAO (International Civilian Aviation Organization) standard. This is how aircrew members, and air traffic controllers should transmit the numbers.

CAUTION – There is not any exception for FL 100, and FL 200 according to the ICAO DOC 9432 Radiotelephony Manual, page 19, chapter 2.4.2, as it is pronounced « FLIGHT LEVEL ONE-ZERO-ZERO », and « FLIGHT LEVEL TWO-ZERO-ZERO ».
However, « Flight level one hundred » follows the French DGAC and the British CAA patterns.

Click on this video:

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