CIAS 2011 – Canadian International Air Show

The Canadian International Air Show took place in Toronto last month.

The CIAS line-up featured the RCAF (Royal Canadian Air Force) Snowbirds; CF-18 Hornets; US Marine tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey; USAF A-10 Thunderbolt; the American team Heavy Metal, and its L-39 Albatross & a T-33 Shooting Star; a Pitts Special S-1-11B SS or Model 11 « Super Stinker »; an Avro Lancaster; the CFB Trenton SkyHawks – the Canadian Forces Parachute Demonstration Team; a Zivko Edge 540 flown by Pete McLeod; the Misty Blues all woman skydiving team; a Sukhoi SU-26M flown by Rick Volker; an H-101 Salto sailplane flown by Manfred Radius; and the Royal Canadian Air Cadets on the Bellanca 8GCBC Scout tow plane and the Schweizer SGS 2-33A Glider.

Watch the video with interviews:

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RENO AIR RACES CRASH – Pilot Tried to Avoid Bleachers

74-year-old Jimmy Leeward, a movie stunt pilot was flying a P-51 Mustang called « Galloping Ghost » for the Reno Air Race yesterday September 16, 2011.

On the video you can see that shortly after lifting-up to reach the middle part of a loop, the aircraft dived towards the bleachers, and crashed very close to them. According to the news, 3 died, and 54 would have been injured, 12 of which in severe conditions. A Mayday emergency call would have been heard a few seconds before the accident.

The Reno Air Races have been cancelled even if the families insisted on letting the airshow go on. Some videos on the Internet show how violent the impact was. The area has been cordoned off as the NTSB is still investigating, as well as FAA officials were on the spot, and a mass-casualty situation has been reported.

Jimmy Leeward would have tried to dodge the bleachers as his P-51 was going down. The famous pilot would have saved hundreds of potential casualties before he died, according to this eyewitness account:

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When mice take the Mickey out of airline…

Mouse in commercial aircraft
Mouse - Photo © George Shuklin, Wikimedia.org

It first happened on Monday September 5, 2011. A Nepal Airlines flight was cancelled at Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu.

Do you guess why? The flight attendants spotted a stowaway mouse onboard their B-757 bound to Bangkok! The small rodent fled from the galley’s pantry, and rushed from a box of drinks to the back of the cabin although the 113 passengers did not notice the tiny stowaway.

The mouse was finally caught thanks to a glue trap. The jetliner was grounded for more than eleven hours.

 

Then, the same Boeing 757 – this time bound to Kathmandu – was grounded at Hong Kong International Airport on Tuesday September 6, in the evening.

The reason: the pilots spotted a mouse in the cockpit just before the airplane departure. The aircraft has not been cleared to take off because this mouse was trapped but then escaped, and would still be on the loose. The 84 passengers were rerouted on a Dragonair aircraft.

 

As far as flight safety is concerned, an aircraft cannot take off with a mouse moving freely onboard as it can gnaw the wiring, and therefore represents a potentiel danger.

It can only be caught or trapped. However, NAC (Nepal Airlines Corporation) could not poison any mouse for a small animal can damage an airplane even if it is dead somewhere, and particularly if in contact with a vital part of the plane.

 

Special thanks to Mr Hermas, and LadyEleanorA who buzzed this piece of news.

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Russian hockey team perish in plane crash

Poor quality fuel possible cause of Yak-42 crash – aviation source

02:15 08/09/2011 Poor quality of aviation fuel could be one of possible reasons for why the Yak-42 plane crashed in Central Russia on Wednesday, killing more than 40 people.>>

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