Fantastic U-2… Listen, watch, enjoy…

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ANGLAIS POUR VOLER – new edition

For those who prepare the FCL 1.028, and/or ICAO-level exams or simply for those who want to make headway, this address will provide everything you wanted to know about aeronautics, phraseology, engineering, either in English or French.

L’ ANGLAIS POUR VOLER is not only a website but a book, and a CD. Its author is Dominique Défossez. She is an MA graduate in English, a chief engineer in air navigation, an experienced air traffic controller, a pilot, a teacher, not to mention an author for « L’anglais pour voler » and « Info-pilote ».

You can get access to the ELIOT’s page. Eliot is a virtual private pilot who likes to fly abroad. He keeps a journal where he makes note of his different flying experiences. An MP3 list is updated and remains available for listening and free downloading on the website.

I bought the book and the CD a month ago. I have already had some books, glossaries, and dictionaries about aeronautics. All these resources are either similar or different. When you read Dominique Defossez’s work, you do feel that she wants to help pilots, controllers, engineers, and mechanics. And it works! It works for the words have been cleverly selected, and well sorted Couverture du Livre L'Anglais Pour Voler de Dominique Défossezout. You can feel through these documents that this work is the result of down-to-earth experience.

The lexical filing has been made both thematic and alphabetical. Moreover, there’s an extra section for abbreviations, plus audio/phonetic references, and a browser at your disposal in the compact disc. Here lies the main asset according to me for most dictionaries of this kind never offered audio support before.

L’anglais pour voler undoubtedly is a very effective tool for the air traffic controllers, the pilots, mechanics, and all those who are fond of aircraft. This remarkable work represents a major teaching/learning asset in the aviation world. Click on the picture hereafter to learn more about Dominique Défossez’s products:

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Pilot’s G-suit

Anti-G coveralls   -  © www.tpub.com

… or ANTI-G COVERALLS

When in flight, the body can have trouble adjusting to stresses produced by rapid changing of speed or direction. In situations such as seat ejection, ditching, or parachute opening shock, the short duration of the excessive force has little effect on the body.

However, changing the direction of flight produces stress forces equal to several times the normal pull of gravity for much longer periods of time. These longer duration forces can have dangerous effects. At 5 g’s (5 times the force of gravity), the aircrewman’s body is exposed to a force that increases its weight 5 times.

This increased weight has many effects. Your body is pushed down into your seat. Your arms and legs feel like lead, and operation of equipment becomes more difficult. The extra weight on your internal organs causes stomach and chest pain. Most important, however, is the effect on your circulatory system. At 5 g’s, your heart cannot pump enough blood to your head. When this happens, you will pass out. Wearing anti-g coveralls will help prevent this from happening.

The Navy uses two models of anti-g coveralls (commonly called « G » suits). These coveralls provide protection against blacking out, loss of vision, and lowered mental efficiency caused by high g-forces experienced in high-performance aircraft. Figure 11-4 shows a typical anti-g coverall. Anti-g coveralls compress your legs and stomach to prevent blood from pooling in your lower body.

This increases your stress tolerance an average of about 2 g’s. Without an anti-g coverall, you may be able to withstand about 4.5 to 5.5 g’s without losing vision or blacking out. With a coverall, you can withstand 6.0 to 7.0 g’s.

This protection is available only for sustained accelerations of 4 to 5 seconds. Anti-g equipment does not offer protection in snap maneuvers where 10 to 12 g’s are applied in about 1 second. Such extreme forces for a short time are not as harmful to the body as are lesser forces sustained for a longer time.

www.tpub.com courtesy

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HOW DO RED BULL AIR RACE PYLONS COME ABOUT?

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Newark – Safety concerns about runway 22L-11 approach

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