DASSAULT 100th ANNIVERSARY SHOW


« La Conquête de l’air » raconte l’histoire de l’aviation sur écran XXL

Dassault-Aviation has developed avionics and plenty of aircraft since the Eclair propeller in 1916 (interview in French, and same post in French thereafter):


100 ans de l’hélice Eclair – Bourget 2015… par Dassault-Aviation

Marcel Dassault was one of the greatest engineers in aviation history. He studied aeronautics in Paris, in the Higher Aeronautics and Mechanical Building School – now SUPAERO – in 1913, in the same entry as Mikhail Gurevitch who designed the MiG-1, MiG-15, and MiG-21. Dassault developed – as explained by Luc Berger, the Dassault-Aviation historian, in the video – a far better propeller for he had found out a lack of efficiency in the propellers of the Caudron G.3 aeroplanes. Dassault called his masterpiece “Hélice Éclair” (Lightning propeller). It is deemed to be the first line-production propeller, and the best one at that time. Georges GUYNEMER and Maxime LENOIR were among the first aces to use the Eclair on their SPAD VII and Nieuport. Dassault produced the MD 315 Flamant twin engine just after WWII. Then, came the first French fighter jet, the MD 450 Ouragan as early as 1949. Marcel Dassault used to say:

“For an airplane to fly well, it must be beautiful.”

Dassault Falcon 7X, Rafale, nEUROn
                                    Photo: DR © Editions de La Martinière

And Dassault kept building so many graceful and sleek aircraft: Mystère, Etendard, Mirage, Falcon, and of course the magnificent Rafale. Dassault has even tested a high-tech drone called nEUROn. Contrary to the common belief, three quarters of Dassault-Aviation’s production is dedicated to civilian aviation and more particularly executive jets. With a strength of 12,000, and 8,000 aircraft delivered throughout the world since 1945, Dassault is a key market player on a global scale. Dassault-Aviation is 100 years old. Paris is to foster a huge show – La Conquête de l’Air – for this major event in one of its most splendid venues – le Grand palais – from April 9th till 14th, 2016. You can book here_>>>>> For further information about Dassault history, excellent gift idea, 2 books here:_>>>>>

EN FRANÇAIS:

Dassault développe de l’avionique et de nombreux avions depuis l’hélice Eclair en 1916. (voir l’interview en français en haut de l’article)

Marcel Dassault était un des plus grands ingénieurs de l’histoire de l’aviation. Il fit ses études d’aéronautique en 1913 à Paris à l’École supérieure d’aéronautique et de construction mécanique, l’ancêtre de SUPAERO, dans la même promotion que Mikhail Gourevitch, celui même qui concevait ensuite les MiG-1, MiG-15 et MiG-21. Dassault développa (commme l’explique Luc Berger, historien spécialiste de Dassault, dans la vidéo) une bien meilleure hélice car il avait découvert sur les Caudrons G.3 un manque d’efficacité à ce niveau. Marcel Dassault baptisa son chef d’oeuvre l’hélice Éclair et elle fût sans doute la première à être produite en chaîne à cette époque. Georges GUYNEMER et Maxime LENOIR furent parmi les premiers as à utiliser l’Éclair sur leur SPAD VII et Nieuport 17. Après la guerre de 39/45, Dassault produisait le bimoteur MD 315 Flamant. Ensuite, vint le premier chasseur français à réaction, le MD 450 Ouragan, dès 1949. Jadis, Marcel Dassault disait:

“Pour qu’un avion vole bien, il faut qu’il soit beau.”

Dassault Mirage III C au Grand Palais à Paris avril 2016
                                              © Dassault Aviation – V. Almansa

Et Dassault poursuivit sa conception de tant d’avions aux lignes gracieuses et épurées: Mystère, Etendard, Mirage, Falcon, et bien sûr le magnifique Rafale. Dassault a même testé en 2012 un drone à la pointe de la technologie, le nEUROn. Contrairement aux idées reçues, les trois quarts de la productin de Dassault-Aviation’s production est tournée vers l’aviation civile et plus particulièrement les jets d’affaire. Dassault et ses 12 000 employés et qui a livré 8 000 avions depuis 1945 à travers le monde, est un acteur majeur du marché mondial.

Dassault-Aviation à l’occasion de ses 100 ans fait les choses en grand au coeur de Paris dans un show, La Conquête de l’Air, dans un de ses plus majestueux endroits, le Grand palais du 9 au 14 avril 2016. Vous pouvez réserver ici_>>>>> Pour plus d’information sur Dassault, en plus d’une excellente idée de cadeau, voici deux livres ici:_>>>>>

PILOT ESCAPING THROUGH UNDERWATER EJECTION

Do you remember that some fighter pilots could safely eject from underwater back in 1965? Could it be survived? One may wonder but a few ejections were reported. The transcript is below the video. Look at that canopy, it looks like it came from an F-8 Crusader:

TRANSCRIPT:

If your aircraft has provision for underwater ejection, you have a ready-made, secondary escape route. Succesful underwater ejections can be made from any aircraft attitude – nose down, tail down, and inverted.

Escape by this method requires no preparation other than that recommended for normal seat ejection. There should be at least ten feet of water above you before you can safely eject. Never eject from the surface. With present systems, the chute cannot open with a zero-zero situation (which means at a height of 0 and at a speed of 0). The effect of free-falling 80 feet to water is little different than falling 80 feet to concrete. True, some lucky ones have lived to tell about it. But it is one hell of a gamble.

When you eject through the canopy underwater, the seat breaks through clearing the way for your body. Because water resistance imposes terrific forces on your head and neck, it is vital to hold the face curtain tight against your head for support. The forces of ejection might cause a momentary blackout. Immediately upon collecting your wits, disconnect yourself from the seat by pulling the emergency release handle breaking your restraints. Now, separate yourself from the seat. This is difficult. You will have to kick and swim violently even though you are disconnected.

If your chute gets hung up on the seat, do not waste time trying to clear it. Release your riser fittings and swim clear off the chute. Do not inflate flotation equipment until clear of the seat. Remember, surface slowly, exhaling as you go. Remove your oxygen mask.

SCHIPOL INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IS 100 YEARS OLD

Feb 14, 2016 – The Dutch airport will be one hundred years old in September this year. It used to be a military airfield on a meadow surrounded by a few huts. It has become one of the major airports in the world. The video here below might have been used for an Air-English examination. Let us play with questions – number 1 – according to the video, when was Schipol airport completely destroyed? Number 2 – Could you quote two major improvements that happened in the 1980s? Watch the video:

 

 

 

 

Here are the answers:

 

 
Number 1: Schipol was completely destroyed during World War 2. (listen again at 00’19”)

Number 2: As far as the 1980s are concerned, you have got the choice between (listen again at 00’47”):

  • The airport apron was expanded;
  • The terminal became bigger;
  • The area was beautified;
  • In time, piers and railway connections were added.

FORMER AVIATION TEMPLE 1st AEROBATICS SCHOOL

Few people know that there was a major aerodrome near Paris more than a century ago. Though Louis Blériots’s Aeroparc contributed a lot to aviation history, it was demolished in 1970. Villagers, aviation fans and historians made a decision of renovating the remains of this aviation temple which. There used to be a splendid video reconstruction which unfotunately no longer exists.

Renovation of  Aéroparc’s Entrance in Buc

(from Xavier Cotton’s article in French)

Louis Blériot's Aéroparc entrance being renovated
Louis Blériot’s Aéroparc entrance being renovated – early Sept. 2015

For the 100th anniversary of the English Channel crossing by Louis Blériot, a well-documented publication was released in 2009 – “Buc à travers l’aviation“. A Mirage III R was given too, by SECAMIC company. This Dassault recce aircraft can be seen in Avenue Jean Casale between Buc and Toussus-le-Noble, France. The Buc citizens could proudly look back at their prestigious aviation past as Buc and Toussus-le-Noble airfields used to be an aviation history cradle.

Villagers and historians wanted to value their aeronautical heritage in 2012 and they made a decision of setting a renovation project of Blériot’s Aéroparc entrance which is located at the beginning of Guynemer Avenue. Many documents from archives allowed them to incentivize an accurate reconstruction. As the pictures show, the renovation works have already begun as of September 2, 2015.

At the same time, the statue erected to commemorate Jean Casale (1893-1923), WWI ace and Blériot’s test pilot et pilote d’essai aux établissements Blériot, will also be restored for it has been damaged by the effects of time. As far as the Mirage III R is concerned, it would also need a new coat of paint.

AÉROPARC LOUIS BLÉRIOT IN BUC, FRANCE 1914 - Toni Giacoia collection
AÉROPARC LOUIS BLÉRIOT IN BUC, FRANCE 1914 – Toni Giacoia’s collection

You can support this work to renovate this important remnant of aviation history by making a tax-deductible donation at a rate of 60% through the Heritage Foundation (Fondation du patrimoine). Please, click on the link hereafter to see the project: https://www.fondation-patrimoine.org/fr/ile-de-france-12/tous-les-projets-593/detail-aeroparc-louis-bleriot-de-buc-13201 and it is possible to download the donation form at : http://www.mairie-buc.fr/images/stories/newsletter/novembre2012/bulletin_de_souscription_BUC.pdf.

Louis Blériot won international renown as well as his presence at the very first Paris Air Show (Salon de l’Aéronautique which occurred at “Le Grand Palais” in Paris instead of Le Bourget) in late 1909 thanks to his Channel crossing on July 25, 1909. He had crossed the English Channel on his Blériot XI monoplane which is still  exhibited at the Musée des Arts et Métiers. Accordingly, Blériot-Aéronautique received a lot of aeroplane orders since then. Louis Blériot wanted to open a flying school. He established his school near Paris, to the south of Versailles on Buc airfield in order to train pilots and test new flying machines. It was inaugurated on November 13th, 1912. The whole airfield and compound was called Aerodrome Louis Blériot.

There was a monumental gate before the main building which looked like a castle. It was the very heart of the school as well as a hotel for the student pilots and a restaurant. Hangars and grandstands were added so as to organise airshows. Many great aviators and aces landed and took off at Blériot’s Aérodrome such as Roland Garros, Maryse Bastié, Maxime Lenoir, Edmond Perreyon and the Swiss John Domenjoz. Célestin Adolphe Pégoud nicknamed “Le roi de l’air” – “King of the air” – was one of the first pilots looping the loop. Here is a video shot on September 21st, 1913 in front of a 200,000 attendance above Blériot’s aerodrome in Buc:

The airfield was very active during WW1 thanks to its SPADs, then in the 1920s. The downturn of the Aéroparc started when Louis Blériot passed away on August 2, 1936. Aéroparc Louis Blériot was occupied by the German troops during WWII and was bombed by the Allies several times in 1944. The Aéroparc facilities were given back to Blériot-Aéronautique but it was left in tatters. The movements stopped in 1966 and it was closed down in 1970 before being demolished a few years after. The remnants of the monumental gate were all that is left from this exceptional past. Therefore, the Aéroparc renovation aims at valuing this site’s aviation history heritage.

Sources :
“Passion pour l’Aviation” from Xavier Cotton’s article in French
First photo : Toni Giacoia  ( http://fclanglais.fr/ )