FIRE EXTINGUISHER CLASSIFICATIONS

Watch, and read the transcript below:

 

 


Transcript:

 

In this tutorial, we will explore the foremost common classifications of fire extinguishers.

The first, and most common type of extinguisher is used for a Class A fire. These are fires fueled by ordinary combustible materials such as paper, wood, carbon, most plastics. The Class A fire extinguisher uses the water to smother the fire.

Class B fires are fueled by flammable liquids such as gasoline, kerosene, grease, and oil. Remember this classification extinguisher – think « B » for Boil, or oil. Class B extinguishers typically use liquid foam agent to smother the fire. You never want to use water on a Class B fire, as the water can cause the flammable liquids to spread like we accidentally drip water on a frying pan, and the grease pops, and in boiling liquid into the air.

Class C fires are fueled by electrical current traveling to wires, circuits, and outlets. Class C extinguishers most commonly use a dry chemical powder to smother the fire. In more sensitive environments such as a recording studio, a Class C extinguisher may use a halon gas that does not leave a residue. These are often referred to as clean agents. You would also never want to use water on a Class C fire for obvious reasons.

Most household extinguishers are a combination of Class A, B, and C ratings. These extinguishers can be used on ordinary combustible fires, liquid fires, and electrical fires.

The last of the four common classifications of fire is the Class D fire. The Class D fires fueled by combustible metals such as magnesium, potassium, and sodium. Class D fire extinguishers are used exclusively for Class D fires, and use materials such as sand, and dry chemical powders to smother the fire.

 

Special thanks to RVTCDEN who shared this video on Youtube.

 

And… Thank you Vince for your help! 😉

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United Airlines Boeing 757 – SAFETY Video and Script

 

Watch, listen, and read:

 

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F-22 Pilots would be Suffering from « Raptor Cough »

F-22 Raptor tight turn
F-22 - © USAF photo Tech Sgt Justin D. Pyle

 

 

 

According to the CBS news video report below, F-22 pilots would have stopped flying 5th-generation F-22 Raptor for they would have reported HH (Health Hazards) incidents onboard the most advanced fighter aircraft in the U.S. Air Force, and the most expensive ever.

 

« The F-22 has been plagued by a mysterious flaw that causes its pilots to become disoriented while at the controls, from a lack of oxygen. »

 

Thanks to this interview, we now know that a pilot would have touched a tree while flying an F-22 as he may have been suffering from hypoxia (oxygen deficiency in body tissue). Some other pilots reported dizziness, vertigo, and coughing spell.

 

« The Air Force launched an investigation that focused on the plane’s On-Board Oxygen Generating System, or OBOGS which takes air from outside the jet, passes through the engine, and through a chemical process to produce a concentrated oxygen that the pilot breathes – Watch the video:

 

 

© USAF photo Tech Sgt Justin D. Pyle, www.af.mil courtesy

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SPECTACULAR CROSSWIND LANDINGS at Bilbao Airport


Agrandir le plan

Some pilots experienced very difficult conditions at Bilbao Airport a few days ago as strong crosswinds – up to 60 miles per hour – swept the runway from starboard (in French: tribord) ie from their right handside, forcing several of them to go around (in French: remettre les gaz):

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CONSEILS de PREPARATION aux EXAMENS FCL 1.200 et FCL 1.028

Important information: FCL 1.028 and FCL 1.200 will be replaced by FCL .055 and FCL .055 D from April 9, 2013.

Airbus A380 turn - Paris Airshow 2009
Airbus A380 turn – Paris Airshow 2009

Un grand merci à Monsieur Thierry HERMAS, professeur d’anglais et de radiotéléphonie aéronautique aux Ecoles d’officiers de l’Armée de l’air (EOAA à Salon de Provence) qui a compilé des documents de la DGAC et ses conseils pour préparer le FCL 1.200 (anciennement appelée QRI pour « Qualification de Radiotéléphonie Internationale« ) et le FCL 1.028 qui est une qualification de pratique de l’anglais OACI (Organisation de l’Aviation Civile Internationale).

Il importe toutefois de surveiller les mises à jours et les dates d’inscription sur le site de la DGAC, derniers liens en date du 29 avril 2012:

FCL 1.200

FCL 1.028

Compétences linguistiques OACI

 

Merci aussi à Xavier Cotton (webmestre de PASSION pour l’AVIATION) pour cette magnifique photo prise au Salon du Bourget (Paris Airshow) en 2009.

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