DASSAULT 100th ANNIVERSARY SHOW


« La Conquête de l’air » raconte l’histoire de l’aviation sur écran XXL

Dassault-Aviation has developed avionics and plenty of aircraft since the Eclair propeller in 1916 (interview in French, and same post in French thereafter):


100 ans de l’hélice Eclair – Bourget 2015… par Dassault-Aviation

Marcel Dassault was one of the greatest engineers in aviation history. He studied aeronautics in Paris, in the Higher Aeronautics and Mechanical Building School – now SUPAERO – in 1913, in the same entry as Mikhail Gurevitch who designed the MiG-1, MiG-15, and MiG-21. Dassault developed – as explained by Luc Berger, the Dassault-Aviation historian, in the video – a far better propeller for he had found out a lack of efficiency in the propellers of the Caudron G.3 aeroplanes. Dassault called his masterpiece « Hélice Éclair » (Lightning propeller). It is deemed to be the first line-production propeller, and the best one at that time. Georges GUYNEMER and Maxime LENOIR were among the first aces to use the Eclair on their SPAD VII and Nieuport. Dassault produced the MD 315 Flamant twin engine just after WWII. Then, came the first French fighter jet, the MD 450 Ouragan as early as 1949. Marcel Dassault used to say:

« For an airplane to fly well, it must be beautiful. »

Dassault Falcon 7X, Rafale, nEUROn
                                    Photo: DR © Editions de La Martinière

And Dassault kept building so many graceful and sleek aircraft: Mystère, Etendard, Mirage, Falcon, and of course the magnificent Rafale. Dassault has even tested a high-tech drone called nEUROn. Contrary to the common belief, three quarters of Dassault-Aviation’s production is dedicated to civilian aviation and more particularly executive jets. With a strength of 12,000, and 8,000 aircraft delivered throughout the world since 1945, Dassault is a key market player on a global scale. Dassault-Aviation is 100 years old. Paris is to foster a huge show – La Conquête de l’Air – for this major event in one of its most splendid venues – le Grand palais – from April 9th till 14th, 2016. You can book here_>>>>> For further information about Dassault history, excellent gift idea, 2 books here:_>>>>>

EN FRANÇAIS:

Dassault développe de l’avionique et de nombreux avions depuis l’hélice Eclair en 1916. (voir l’interview en français en haut de l’article)

Marcel Dassault était un des plus grands ingénieurs de l’histoire de l’aviation. Il fit ses études d’aéronautique en 1913 à Paris à l’École supérieure d’aéronautique et de construction mécanique, l’ancêtre de SUPAERO, dans la même promotion que Mikhail Gourevitch, celui même qui concevait ensuite les MiG-1, MiG-15 et MiG-21. Dassault développa (commme l’explique Luc Berger, historien spécialiste de Dassault, dans la vidéo) une bien meilleure hélice car il avait découvert sur les Caudrons G.3 un manque d’efficacité à ce niveau. Marcel Dassault baptisa son chef d’oeuvre l’hélice Éclair et elle fût sans doute la première à être produite en chaîne à cette époque. Georges GUYNEMER et Maxime LENOIR furent parmi les premiers as à utiliser l’Éclair sur leur SPAD VII et Nieuport 17. Après la guerre de 39/45, Dassault produisait le bimoteur MD 315 Flamant. Ensuite, vint le premier chasseur français à réaction, le MD 450 Ouragan, dès 1949. Jadis, Marcel Dassault disait:

« Pour qu’un avion vole bien, il faut qu’il soit beau. »

Dassault Mirage III C au Grand Palais à Paris avril 2016
                                              © Dassault Aviation – V. Almansa

Et Dassault poursuivit sa conception de tant d’avions aux lignes gracieuses et épurées: Mystère, Etendard, Mirage, Falcon, et bien sûr le magnifique Rafale. Dassault a même testé en 2012 un drone à la pointe de la technologie, le nEUROn. Contrairement aux idées reçues, les trois quarts de la productin de Dassault-Aviation’s production est tournée vers l’aviation civile et plus particulièrement les jets d’affaire. Dassault et ses 12 000 employés et qui a livré 8 000 avions depuis 1945 à travers le monde, est un acteur majeur du marché mondial.

Dassault-Aviation à l’occasion de ses 100 ans fait les choses en grand au coeur de Paris dans un show, La Conquête de l’Air, dans un de ses plus majestueux endroits, le Grand palais du 9 au 14 avril 2016. Vous pouvez réserver ici_>>>>> Pour plus d’information sur Dassault, en plus d’une excellente idée de cadeau, voici deux livres ici:_>>>>>

Foreign Object Damage and FOD Prevention

Foreign Object Damage (FOD) can be caused by Foreign Object Debris (called FOD too). FOD can also mean « Foreign Object Detection« . Watch the video, and read its transcript below:

Transcript :

 

Our Air Force has the most technically advanced aircraft in the world – deadly fighters, and bombers, mighty cargo and tanker workhorses, our many helicopters, and a variety of specialty aircraft.

But they can all be easily grounded by FOD.

Foreign objects cause damage to our aircraft in many ways. For example, cut tires, and jammed flight or engine controls. FOD has caused at least six fighter aircraft to crash over the last twelve years! Some of the items that caused these mishaps were:

  • Rags;
  • Safety wire pliers;
  • A piece of aluminum foil;
  • A one-inch piece of safety wire;
  • Even a small washer!

These incidents show that poor housekeeping, and work practices are still the two major contributors to preventable FOD. We can eliminate FOD. To do so, we must make these six commonsense steps, part of our every job, every step, every day.

  1. The first step – be aware that you can make a difference, and that FOD is a constant problem. Every time you sign out a tool box, work a job, or just step out to help someone, keep your eyes open for tools, rocks, and other debris. And when you see something, stop, and pick it up. Occasionally, you may need a sweeper to clean up an area. MAC usually coordinate with base OPS. MAC (Military Airlift Command) usually coordinates this support with base OPS.
  2. The second step – keep your work area clean. Check your shoes for foreign objects, and empty your pockets of keys, change, pencils, and trash. Place these items into a FOD bag before entering the cockpit, intake, other confined areas, or before working on top of the aircraft. Are you covering all of those lines, houses, cannon plugs, and ducts during extended maintenance? The ACES II ejection seat is the most reliable, and safest seat in the world, as long as nothing gets in the way. Somebody did not report losing this pencil tip. It then migrated in flight to the sequence start switch which activates the seat computer as it departs the aircraft. It was discovered during a visual inspection of the seat when it was removed for other maintenance. Because of the protective shield over the switch, and the tight clearance in the cockpit, it normally would never have been found. How do you think the pilots felt when they heard about it? Do you check the area one more time before you leave? It is possible the person before you left something behind.
  3. Step three – we have to keep our vehicles clean. We know foreign objects get around, and many times are, vehicles carry them out to the flight line. Tire checks – are you constantly doing them every time you went to the flight line? How about after you drove out of the taxiway to let the jet pass? How clean is your vehicle? Is there safety wire, trash, or fasteners on the floor? Is the FOD can overflowing before you empty it? If you have a vehicle magnet installed, are you checking it daily?
  4. Step four – Thorough FOD walks. Are you looking, or are you out there just stretching your legs? Pay special attention to the grounding points, and cement grooves, and cracks. These areas are always filling up with trash, rocks, and hardware. A good daily FOD walk helps us keep up with all the debris that still manages to get onto the ramp. A FOD walk should have found this bolt. Instead, it was sucked up, off of the ramp by a B-1. Three first-stage compressor blades, and one inlet guide vane were damaged. It cost us 56 man-hours, and over $ 35,000 to remove and fix this engine.
  5. Step five – good tool and hardware control is a must. Remember the last time you lost a tool, or a nut? How long did you look for it? Did you find it? When was the last tool report started? Remember – tool control starts when you receive a toolbox. Before you sign for it, make sure all missing tools are written up, and check the box for pieces of safety wire, and other trash. Woe, slow down, and look. Is that a tool, or the tool cutout? If you find a tool missing, don’t accept the box, and make sure a last tool report, and investigation is started. Also, never leave tools in hardware in or on the aircraft. Do a good inventory of your toolbox, and TOs* after every job. This alone will narrow the search area, and greatly increase your chances of finding a last tool. Think about it, what would you rather check? One aircraft, or three? When you do find a tool missing, start looking for it immediately. If you can find it after a short search, report it immediately to the expediter, or dock chief, and get some extra help to look for the missing tool or hardware. For tight or inaccessible areas, you can also use a borescope** or X-ray equipment to locate lost items. How would you tell the pilot if the jet has just taxied? What if it is flying? A file about this size was left behind after blending two engine blades on a C-5, possibly fallen behind a nacelle blocker door*** during the job. Four people then signed for the box over the next several days before someone finally noticed, and reported the last tool. The file was not located, and then came loose in flight the next day. This incident caused over 550 men-hours of work, and $ 66,000 in damage to the engine. Hardware control is simply taking only what you need, and counting how many nuts, bolts, or other hardware you take from bench stock. After the job, make sure you account for all the hardware. If you don’t complete the job, annotate the screw bag with the quantity, the type of hardware, and your name. This will help the person who finishes the job track down any missing hardware. Here is what a misplaced ¼ inch nut did to a C-130 engine. Over 30 blades were damaged beyond repair, not counting depot costs – the damages have already taken 64 man-hours, and exceeded $ 38,000 in damages. Sometimes, we accidentally leave items inside the intake danger area, or in the intake before an engine start. These have included VTR tapes, flashlights, cleaning bottles, and aircraft forms. Are you paying attention? Or have you just been lucky?
  6. Step six – follow the T.O.. For tight or inaccessible access areas, you can also use a borescope, or X-ray equipment to locate lost items. How would you tell the pilot if the jet has just taxied? What if it is flying? A file about this size was left behind after blending two engine blades on a C-5, possibly fallen behind a nacelle blocker door*** during the job. Four people then signed for the box over the next several days before someone finally noticed, and reported the last tool. The file was not located, and then came loose in flight the next day. This incident caused over 550 men-hours of work, and $ 66,000 in damage to the engine. Hardware control is simply taking only what you need, and counting how many nuts, bolts, or other hardware you take from bench stock. After the job, make sure you account for all the hardware. If you don’t complete the job, annotate the screw bag with the quantity, the type of hardware, and your name. This will help the person who finishes the job track down any missing hardware. Here is what a misplaced ¼ inch nut did to a C-130 engine. Over 30 blades were damaged beyond repair, not counting depot costs – the damages have already taken 64 man-hours, and exceeded $ 38,000 in damages. Sometimes, we accidentally leave items inside the intake danger area, or in the intake before an engine start. These have included VTR tapes, flashlights, cleaning bottles, and aircraft forms. Are you paying attention? Or have you just been lucky?

6. Step six (again and further) – Follow the T.O.. Several times we have had equipment, and panels come off during an engine run, or in flight, causing serious damage. On the last job before a three-day weekend, an experienced crew chief and his assistant were preparing an F-16 for an engine run. He skipped the warning, and the step to check the run screen safety pin for security. During the engine run, one pin came out, and after whipping around in the intake for a few seconds, the lanyard broke. The pin destroyed over 426 blades. Total cost – $ 69,000 and 366 man-hours. What was the cost of the crew chief? How do you think he felt? Think of what he went through. The de-certification, the investigation, the waiting. Was the two or three seconds saved worth it? Sometimes, confusing or incomplete TOs are part of the problem. Improper installation caused by poor tech aide, and inexperience created a stress crack in the upper anti collision light lens in a KC-10.

* T.O.: Technical Order

** (or boroscope)

*** Thrust reverser (pelle d’inverseur de poussée)

7 major airlines outsourcing 40% of their maintenance

A Boeing 737-300 has recently been forced to perform an emergency landing after an explosive depressurization due to a rather big hole in its fuselage. Reports suggested that some MRO (Maintenance; Repair; and Overhaul) operations had been outsourced to El Salvador, and might have caused such an accident.

However, the NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) said that the last heavy « C » check – the last major MRO operation on the aircraft – was performed at the Dallas Southwest maintenance facilities in March 2010.

The TWU (Transport Workers Union) has condemned the use of aircraft repair stations outside the USA, calling on Congress and the Federal Aviation Administration to toughen the FAA’s oversight – Watch the video:

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RAF and Royal Navy HARRIER jets farewell

The Harrier entered in service 41 years ago. Then, the Harrier II (GR5, GR7, and GR9) took off in 1985 for the first time. The F-35 Lightning II or JSF – 5th-generation Joint Strike Fighter – should replace these V/STOL (Vertical/Short Takeoff and Landing) fighter aircraft.

Sixteen RAF Harriers conducted a farewell flypast yesterday while the last four Harriers left HMS Ark Royal forever. Both the Ark Royal and the Harriers are to be decommissioned under cost-saving plans. Click on the video below:

LC-130 takes off for Operation Deep Freeze

Master Sgt. Joseph Sinatra checks the air spring pressure on an LC-130 Hercules during a stop Oct. 18, 2010, at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The springs are used to absorb the shock of landing the ski-equipped aircraft on the Antarctic ice. Sergeant Sinatra and the rest of his LC-130 aircrew stopped at Hickam while en route to Antarctica to support Operation Deep Freeze, the Defense Department’s logistical support to U.S. research activities at the southernmost continent. Sergeant Sinatra is an LC-130 crew chief assigned to the New York Air National Guard’s 109th Airlift Wing at Stratton Air National Guard Base, N.Y. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Kerry Jackson).
US Air Force Link (www.af.mil) courtesy

LC-130 taking off with JATO from Greenland
LC-130 taking off with JATO from Greenland – Photo © Søren Wedel Nielsen (Copyright 2005)