PREPARATION ANGLAIS OACI – BONNE NOUVELLE!

Lexique aéronautique L'Anglais pour Voler
Lexique aéronautique L’Anglais pour Voler

 

Le livre (et CD-Rom) « L’Anglais pour Voler » est devenu une référence de l’anglais aéronautique et à juste titre: les 5000 mots et 1500 abréviations compilés sont présentés à la fois par ordre alphabétique et exprimés dans des chapitres thématiques qui peuvent se révéler un excellent outil d’entraînement pour les aviateurs dans leur quête du FCL .055 pour les personnels navigants et de l’ELPAC (English Language Proficiency for Aeronautical Communication) pour les contrôleurs de circulation aérienne.

Dominique Défossez,ingénieur en chef de la navigation aérienne, contrôleur aérien et titulaire d’une maîtrise d’anglais met régulièrement à jour son lexique et CD interactif « L’Anglais pour Voler » depuis plusieurs années déjà.

Voici une très bonne nouvelle pour ceux qui sont équipés d’Apple en iPhone et iPad qui souhaitent parfaire leur anglais OACI puisque L’Anglais pour Voler est désormais disponible dans une application que vous pouvez découvrir en cliquant à droite sur l’image de la couverture de cette 5ème édition:

 

For Those Who Attended The AERONAUTICAL ENGLISH Class

Thank you so much for attending this aviation English class at « Festival des Langues » in Tours today, Sunday, November 24, 2013. Important information: FCL 1.028 and FCL 1.200 have been replaced by FCL .055 and FCL .055 D since April 9, 2013.

Here is the soundtrack we listened to this afternoon. You can download it, then listen directly to 10′ so as to get to the ATIS. Here are the keys (les solutions), see page 4 for the ATIS test, and at the bottom of page 21 for the keys.

Here is a document from the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) website that could help you about aircraft vocabulary (click on the picture below):

Man riding a plandAs I have told you, for properly transmitting voice communications, you need read ICAO – DOC 4444 ATM/PANS (Air Traffic Management, updated March, 2010) which costs up to $295.00 here (click on the link below):

http://store1.icao.int/index.php/air-traffic-management-procedures-for-air-navigation-services-pans-atm-doc-4444-english-printed.html

However, you can read a previous edition of DOC 4444 (14th Edition, updated on November 24, 2005 for instance) if you type « doc 4444 – air traffic management fourteenth edition » like here below (click on the picture):

ICAO DOC 4444 ATM - Air Traffic Management, 14th edition 2001 updated 2005

It isn’t worth reading everything as just for radiotelephony purpose, just skip to chapter 12 – page 161 until page 196.

Two other documents are important for aviation voice communications, and air traffic control:

Remember:

SARPs = Standard And Recommended Practices
PANS = Procedures for Air Navigation Services

Thank you for your attention, and have a nice week 🙂

For Those Who Attended The AERONAUTICAL ENGLISH Class

First of all, thank you so much for attending this aviation English class at « Festival des Langues » in Tours today, Saturday, November 24, 2012. Important information: FCL 1.028 and FCL 1.200 will be replaced by FCL .055 and FCL .055 D from April 9, 2013.

Here is the soundtrack we listened to this afternoon. You can download it, then listen directly to 10′ so as to get to the ATIS. Here are the keys (les solutions), see page 4 for the ATIS test, and at the bottom of page 21 for the keys.

Here is a document from the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) website that could help you about aircraft vocabulary (click on the picture below):

FAA AIRCRAFT PARTSAs I have told you, for properly transmitting voice communications, you need read ICAO – DOC 4444 ATM (Air Traffic Management, updated March, 2010) which costs up to $295.00 here (click on the link below):

http://store1.icao.int/documentItemView.ch2?ID=7139

However, you can read a previous edition of DOC 4444 (14th Edition, updated on November 24, 2005 for instance) if you type « doc 4444 – air traffic management fourteenth edition » like here below (click on the picture):

ICAO DOC 4444 ATM - Air Traffic Management, 14th edition 2001 updated 2005

It isn’t worth reading everything as just for radiotelephony purpose, just skip to chapter 12 – page 161 until page 196.

Two other documents are important for aviation voice communications, and air traffic control:

Thank you for your attention, and have a nice weekend  🙂

Mach-3 SR-71 Blackbird’s HOT COCKPIT

Blackbird onboard USS Intrepid – Photo © Xavier Cotton http://www.passionpourlaviation.fr

As you may have heard, the mythical Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird was a strategic reconnaissance aircraft able to fly at more than Mach 3 – Mach 3.3 ie around 3,500 km/h; or 1,900 kts; and at a maximum flight level of… FL 850 or 26 kilometers high!

The Blackbird indeed had a unique flight envelope with a particular doghouse plot (since she could not exceed 3.5 G), and an exceptionnal coffin corner limited by her CIT – Compressor Inlet Temperature of 427°C maximum.

This aircraft was also unique for her engines were two J58 ramjets fuelled by JP-7 especially refined for extreme flying purpose. This special fuel could drip and leak abundantly as the airframe made up of titanium was retracted while taxiing, and became airtight only when it got its operating shape while flying very fast and very high because of the air density, and surrounding pressure plus the heating caused by the air friction at such speeds. In short, the whole structure considerably expanded when airborne.

The irony – I heard it on the grapevine, or read it somewhere on the web – that titanium which turned into dark blue while flying (SR-71s probably deserved those unofficial other nicknames « Bluebird », or « Habu » viper) was « imported » from… USSR!

Pilots must have taken significant risks inherent in flying such an aircraft as mentioned in this previous post. These pilots used to fly over the USSR to take strategic reconnaissance photographs during the Cold war. They wore pressurized spacesuits so that their blood could not boil in case of decompression or ejection at such altitudes.

The Blackbird travelled faster than a rifle bullet, and the air friction could have melt aluminum-skinned aircraft. At Mach 3.2, fuel cycled behind the chine surface in order to cool the aircraft! The inner windshield temperature could reach 120°C even though a heavy-duty cooling system was on a full function. On landing, the outside temperature of the canopy could reach 300°C, and it must have been far beyond on the fuselage, and wing surfaces while flying at high speeds. The pilot could feel the heat behind his protective gloves!

Special thanks to Xavier Cotton for the Blackbird photos. Please, visit his website on http://www.passionpourlaviation.fr

Extraordinary video at JFK airport – AirFranceA380…jostles…Bombardier CRJ700 while taxiing !

This video has become a buzz since yesterday night. The Airbus A380 super-heavy jumbo jet wingtip would have clipped the tail of the CRJ700 according to some reports. The passengers were violently shaken in the cabin of the smaller plane as the Bombadier airplane was instantly pivoted around its yaw axis while… taxiing!!!

Here is the ATC voice communication when the Airbus A380 took out the CRJ700:

… and here is an – outdated – aeronautical chart to understand what happened and where on JFK International’s tarmac:

New-York City JFK international airport chart runways October 2016

Special thanks to Lady E and Xavier for passing the news on 😉