HEROIC GUYNEMER 100 YEARS AGO

Here is a tribute to Captain Georges GUYNEMER who was killed in action on September 11th, 1917. Three months earlier, he fought with Ernst Udet, the ace who came up 2nd after the Red Baron. You can watch hereafter how this dogfight reportedly happened, and how these fighter pilots had the gut to keep honor above all:

Georges Guynemer, French Air Force pilot and WWI ace
Georges Guynemer by « Lucien » – Jebulon https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jebulon

Remember Guynemer’s mottos:

FAIRE FACE (face up to it) was then adopted by the French Air Force Academy (FAFA) as their motto. A few words that well expresse the French pilots’ bravery.

WWI French ace Georges Guynemer used to say:

« Il y a une limite à toute chose, et il faut toujours la dépasser. »

‘Everything has a limit which has always got to be surpassed.’

« Lorsque l’on n’a pas tout donné, on n’a rien donné. »

‘As long as you have not given your all, you have given nothing.’

Loyal to these principles, the French ace took part in several hundreds of aerial combats, crediting 53 victories, maybe 88 victories because the French victory validation system was demanding. He was shot down seven times, and he was admired for he always survived, but that September 11, a hundred years ago. The hero took off once again, dashed to the frontlines, outnumbered by German warplanes in a last dogfighting over Belgium. Then, he fell. Since then, the French Air Force aviators have worn a black tie in sign of mourning.

RIP

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GUSTAVE WHITEHEAD FLEW ON AUGUST 14, 1901

He took off that day. It was 115 years ago, two years before the Wrights. Gustav Weisskopf had changed his name into Gustave Whitehead before building his aeroplane whose name was the « Condor », or number 21. Gustave was a German immigrant from Leutershausen in Bavaria, where a splendid museum https://www.weisskopf.de commemorates the feats of the brilliant inventor.

Two replicas of his plane #21 flew in 1986 in the U.S.A., and in 1997 in Germany. Several books have been written about Gustave Whitehead so far. Susan O’Dwyer Brinchman published the latest one last year. Her searching follows her father’s, Major William J. O’Dwyer, a retired U.S. Air Force Reserve officer who had found early Whitehead’s photos in an attic, in 1963, and researched Whitehead for the next 45 years, interviewing many witnesses. Susan worked with him during the later decades and recently, has found even more. She explains why Whitehead must have been the first in the world to perform a steerable, propelled without catapult, heavier-than-air flight. She shares an extensive FAQ and lots of resources on her website here: http://gustavewhitehead.info/gustave-whitehead-resources/  which are quite compelling. You can order her book Gustave Whitehead: First in Flight on Amazon or get a signed one by clicking on the cover here below:

Book cover First in Flight on Gustave Whietehead by Susan O'Dwyer BrinchmanBook cover story of Gustave Whitehead First in Flight aviation history Connecticut

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SCHIPOL INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IS 100 YEARS OLD

Feb 14, 2016 – The Dutch airport will be one hundred years old in September this year. It used to be a military airfield on a meadow surrounded by a few huts. It has become one of the major airports in the world. The video here below might have been used for an Air-English examination. Let us play with questions – number 1 – according to the video, when was Schipol airport completely destroyed? Number 2 – Could you quote two major improvements that happened in the 1980s? Watch the video:

 

 

 

 

Here are the answers:

 

 
Number 1: Schipol was completely destroyed during World War 2. (listen again at 00’19 »)

Number 2: As far as the 1980s are concerned, you have got the choice between (listen again at 00’47 »):

  • The airport apron was expanded;
  • The terminal became bigger;
  • The area was beautified;
  • In time, piers and railway connections were added.
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May 8th 1945 – VE-Day veteran remembers + 1st American-British-French-Russian parade in Moscow

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