Prepa PLS Anglais – Aviation English

Posts Tagged Controllers

HOLDING PATTERN & TEARDROP ENTRY REMARKABLY EXPLAINED

A holding pattern is nothing more than a big oval formed in a race-track shape that is designed to keep an aircraft in a specified space for a specified amount of time. A holding pattern can be published on either airway charts or terminal charts or can be unpublished, and specified by the air traffic controller. Watch the video (from 1’49”):

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ICAO Air Traffic Radiotelephony – Transmitting Numbers

Here is an audio/video file with transcript about how the numbers must be pronounced according to the ICAO (International Civilian Aviation Organization) standard. This is how aircrew members, and air traffic controllers should transmit the numbers.

CAUTION – There is not any exception for FL 100, and FL 200 according to the ICAO DOC 9432 Radiotelephony Manual, page 19, chapter 2.4.2, as it is pronounced “FLIGHT LEVEL ONE-ZERO-ZERO”, and “FLIGHT LEVEL TWO-ZERO-ZERO”.
However, “Flight level one hundred” follows the French DGAC and the British CAA patterns.

Click on this video:

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FLIGHT SAFETY at Schipol airport

CNN’s Rebecca Anderson explains how the safety measures are ensured at Amsterdam’s Schipol airport. You can see in this video how the air traffic controllers work and guide the pilots in, and how the bird management and control personnel copes with BASH – Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard:

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Air Traffic Control phraseology training

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Air Traffic Control – Interesting voice communications with scripts

Caution: As far as this video is concerned, it would be well advised not to use some of the phrases heard on its soundtrack during an FCL 1.200/1.028 speaking examination…

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Video – SAAB 35 DRAKEN tested as an interceptor

Austrian AF Draken - Saab J 35 - Photo © HoHun (2003)

The Swedish-made Saab 35 Draken was a second generation jet fighter. 644 of them were built. This fighter aircraft used to fly during the Cold War as early as 1955, and entered in service in 1960.

Maybe her particular double-delta shape was worth calling it “Draken” which means “kite”. She was more an air defense aircraft than a dogfighter aircraft.

She retired from the RDAF, the Royal Danish Air Force in 1993; from the SwAF, the Swedish Air Force in 1999; from the FIAF, the Finnish Air Force in 2000; and from the AAF, the Austrian Air Force in 2005.

Hereafter an interesting video featuring a Saab 29 Tunnan (Flying Barrel); a Saab 32 Lansen (Lance); and a Draken momentarily as an interceptor; with her rate of climb nearing 35,000ft/min, she could reach FL650 – more than 20 kilometres above the earth – to hit her target:

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