RTF UPDATE / MISE A JOUR REGLEMENTATION RADIOTELEPHONIE

WARNING: Please check updates on ICAO, EASA, DGAC, SIA, CAA, FAA websites or other regulations if need be.

AVERTISSEMENT: Vérifiez SVP sur les sites de l’OACI, l’AESA, la DGAC, le SIA, la CAA, la FAA ou autres réglementations si nécessaire.

An important update has been released this month – May 2016 – making 06/27/2000 decree more accurate, and complete about voice-communication practices.

Une importante mise à jour a été éditée ce mois-ci (mai 2016), rendant le décret du 27/06/2000 plus précis et plus complet sur les pratiques des communications vocales.

https://www.sia.aviation-civile.gouv.fr/dossier/texteregle/RADIOTEL_V3.pdf

As I have told you, for properly transmitting voice communications, you need to read ICAO – DOC 4444 ATM/PANS (Air Traffic Management, updated March, 2010) which costs up to $295.00 here (click on the link below):

http://store1.icao.int/index.php/air-traffic-management-procedures-for-air-navigation-services-pans-atm-doc-4444-english-printed.html

However, you can read a previous edition of DOC 4444 (14th Edition, updated on November 24, 2005 for instance) if you type “doc 4444 – air traffic management fourteenth edition” like here below (click on the picture):

ICAO DOC 4444 ATM - Air Traffic Management, 14th edition 2001 updated 2005

It isn’t worth reading everything as just for radiotelephony purpose, just skip to chapter 12 – page 161 until page 196.

Two other documents are important for aviation voice communications, and air traffic control:

Remember:

SARPs = Standard And Recommended Practices
PANS = Procedures for Air Navigation Services

And check updates as often as possible.

Here is a document from the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) website that could help you about aircraft vocabulary (click on the picture below):

Man riding a pland

Thank you for your attention, and have a nice week 🙂

LANDING – HOW DIFFICULT IT CAN BE…

 

WarningThis voice communication does not comply with the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) recommendations. However, you can click off, and listen without reading the script on this video in order to jot down this radio communication for listening training purpose:

 

Waterbury-Oxford Airport Map

Click on the map above to enlarge. (U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration courtesy via Wikimedia)

 

These things happen.

  1. Bearing reported with a ninety-degree error, then corrected;
  2. Uncertainty of the downwind leg;
  3. Traffic not in sight;
  4. Uncertainty as to which airport is in sight;
  5. Requests are said again;
  6. Another airport in the vicinity with same runway configuration;
  7. Traffic off course;
  8. Within half a mile, no traffic in sight, and no radar tracking;
  9. Pilot cannot hear at times or does not reply;
  10. Confusion between ident and squawk;
  11. Pilot does not know how to use the transponder;
  12. Uncertainty of the type of aircraft, then corrected.

Landings may be difficult at times, indeed…

RENO AIR RACES CRASH – Pilot Tried to Avoid Bleachers

74-year-old Jimmy Leeward, a movie stunt pilot was flying a P-51 Mustang called « Galloping Ghost » for the Reno Air Race yesterday September 16, 2011.

On the video you can see that shortly after lifting-up to reach the middle part of a loop, the aircraft dived towards the bleachers, and crashed very close to them. According to the news, 3 died, and 54 would have been injured, 12 of which in severe conditions. A Mayday emergency call would have been heard a few seconds before the accident.

The Reno Air Races have been cancelled even if the families insisted on letting the airshow go on. Some videos on the Internet show how violent the impact was. The area has been cordoned off as the NTSB is still investigating, as well as FAA officials were on the spot, and a mass-casualty situation has been reported.

Jimmy Leeward would have tried to dodge the bleachers as his P-51 was going down. The famous pilot would have saved hundreds of potential casualties before he died, according to this eyewitness account:

FAA revolutionary AIR TRAFFIC system

According to the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) the new GPS systems would reduce the airline delays by up to 35% as reported in this video:

Pointing lasers at aircraft will cost offenders big time

Pointing lasers at aircraft can cost pilots their lives. The FAA has decided to increase the penalty. This prank is to cost the offenders a hefty fine – up to $11,000. Some pen-shaped laser pointers have been reported around a thousand times in the USA in 2011, and 2,836 incidents were reported last year.

It may seem a harmless prank. However, when a laser pen user aims at an aircraft, it turns into a dangerous hazard as the laser light is reflected everywhere. When the beams re reflected into the pilots’ eyes, the can get blind, and cause a crash.