For Those Who Attended The AERONAUTICAL ENGLISH Class

Thank you so much for attending this aviation English class at « Festival des Langues » in Tours today, Sunday, November 24, 2013. Important information: FCL 1.028 and FCL 1.200 have been replaced by FCL .055 and FCL .055 D since April 9, 2013.

Here is the soundtrack we listened to this afternoon. You can download it, then listen directly to 10′ so as to get to the ATIS. Here are the keys (les solutions), see page 4 for the ATIS test, and at the bottom of page 21 for the keys.

Here is a document from the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) website that could help you about aircraft vocabulary (click on the picture below):

Man riding a plandAs I have told you, for properly transmitting voice communications, you need read ICAO – DOC 4444 ATM/PANS (Air Traffic Management, updated March, 2010) which costs up to $295.00 here (click on the link below):

http://store1.icao.int/index.php/air-traffic-management-procedures-for-air-navigation-services-pans-atm-doc-4444-english-printed.html

However, you can read a previous edition of DOC 4444 (14th Edition, updated on November 24, 2005 for instance) if you type « doc 4444 – air traffic management fourteenth edition » like here below (click on the picture):

ICAO DOC 4444 ATM - Air Traffic Management, 14th edition 2001 updated 2005

It isn’t worth reading everything as just for radiotelephony purpose, just skip to chapter 12 – page 161 until page 196.

Two other documents are important for aviation voice communications, and air traffic control:

Remember:

SARPs = Standard And Recommended Practices
PANS = Procedures for Air Navigation Services

Thank you for your attention, and have a nice week 🙂

Infos Examen d’Anglais du Pilote – Flight Crew Licensing FCL .055:

 

Vatry, Coupe Breitling - ©Xavier Cotton
Vatry, Coupe Breitling – ©Xavier Cotton

June 30th, 2013 – L’examen concernant les communications vocales en anglais de la radiotéléphonie pourrait changer en France.

Le FCL .055 D (équivalent de l’ancien FCL 1.200 ou précédemment QRI) pourrait disparaître à la fin de l’année 2013 pour laisser place à un format d’examen FCL .055 VFR ou IFR au choix (ex FCL 1.028 VFR/IFR). Le QCM de 10 questions pourrait donc être abandonné.

Actuellement, le niveau 4 OACI est nécessaire. Il est valable 4 ans. Le niveau 5 est valable 6 ans et le niveau 6 qui n’est plus délivré qu’au centre de la DGAC de Paris-Orly est valable à vie. Toutefois, la délivrance du niveau 6 en France est devenue très rare. L’inscription à l’examen coûte actuellement 100 euros.

 

FCL = Flight Crew Licensing;
QRI = Qualification de Radiotéléphonie Internationale;
VFR = Visual Flight Rules;
IFR = Instrument Flight Rules;
OACI = Organisation de l’Aviation Civile Internationale;
DGAC = Direction Générale de l’Aviation Civile;
QCM = Questionnaire à Choix Multiple.

ATTENTION le FCL .055 remplace les FCL 1.200 et 1.028 à partir d’AVRIL 2013

Chers lecteurs et abonnés,

Aujourd’hui samedi 30 mars 2013, les examens de radiotéléphonie aéronautique JAA/JAR FCL 1.200 et FCL 1.028 en France n’ont plus que quelques jours à vivre comme vous pouvez le voir sur ce calendrier: lien périmé.

Attention toutefois aux dates et aux centres car ce calendrier semble avoir subi déjà quelques modifications comme on peut le découvrir sur le calendrier du site d’inscrition d’OCEANE. A partir du 9 avril 2013, le FCL .055 D remplacera le FCL 1.200 avec un format similaire. Les FCL .055 VFR et IFR remplaceront les FCL 1.028 VFR et IFR.

Des évolutions devraient arriver avec les FCL 1.055 pour les pilotes ou navigants sur avions et FCL 2.055 pour les pilotes d’hélicoptères. Pour l’instant, les informations disponibles sur le site officiel de la DGAC concernant la grille d’évaluation OACI (Organisation de l’Aviation Civile Internationale) sont toujours valables.

For Those Who Attended The AERONAUTICAL ENGLISH Class

First of all, thank you so much for attending this aviation English class at « Festival des Langues » in Tours today, Saturday, November 24, 2012. Important information: FCL 1.028 and FCL 1.200 will be replaced by FCL .055 and FCL .055 D from April 9, 2013.

Here is the soundtrack we listened to this afternoon. You can download it, then listen directly to 10′ so as to get to the ATIS. Here are the keys (les solutions), see page 4 for the ATIS test, and at the bottom of page 21 for the keys.

Here is a document from the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration) website that could help you about aircraft vocabulary (click on the picture below):

FAA AIRCRAFT PARTSAs I have told you, for properly transmitting voice communications, you need read ICAO – DOC 4444 ATM (Air Traffic Management, updated March, 2010) which costs up to $295.00 here (click on the link below):

http://store1.icao.int/documentItemView.ch2?ID=7139

However, you can read a previous edition of DOC 4444 (14th Edition, updated on November 24, 2005 for instance) if you type « doc 4444 – air traffic management fourteenth edition » like here below (click on the picture):

ICAO DOC 4444 ATM - Air Traffic Management, 14th edition 2001 updated 2005

It isn’t worth reading everything as just for radiotelephony purpose, just skip to chapter 12 – page 161 until page 196.

Two other documents are important for aviation voice communications, and air traffic control:

Thank you for your attention, and have a nice weekend  🙂

LANDING – HOW DIFFICULT IT CAN BE…

 

WarningThis voice communication does not comply with the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) recommendations. However, you can click off, and listen without reading the script on this video in order to jot down this radio communication for listening training purpose:

 

Waterbury-Oxford Airport Map

Click on the map above to enlarge. (U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration courtesy via Wikimedia)

 

These things happen.

  1. Bearing reported with a ninety-degree error, then corrected;
  2. Uncertainty of the downwind leg;
  3. Traffic not in sight;
  4. Uncertainty as to which airport is in sight;
  5. Requests are said again;
  6. Another airport in the vicinity with same runway configuration;
  7. Traffic off course;
  8. Within half a mile, no traffic in sight, and no radar tracking;
  9. Pilot cannot hear at times or does not reply;
  10. Confusion between ident and squawk;
  11. Pilot does not know how to use the transponder;
  12. Uncertainty of the type of aircraft, then corrected.

Landings may be difficult at times, indeed…