FIRE EXTINGUISHER CLASSIFICATIONS

Watch, and read the transcript below:

 

 


Transcript:

 

In this tutorial, we will explore the foremost common classifications of fire extinguishers.

The first, and most common type of extinguisher is used for a Class A fire. These are fires fueled by ordinary combustible materials such as paper, wood, carbon, most plastics. The Class A fire extinguisher uses the water to smother the fire.

Class B fires are fueled by flammable liquids such as gasoline, kerosene, grease, and oil. Remember this classification extinguisher – think « B » for Boil, or oil. Class B extinguishers typically use liquid foam agent to smother the fire. You never want to use water on a Class B fire, as the water can cause the flammable liquids to spread like we accidentally drip water on a frying pan, and the grease pops, and in boiling liquid into the air.

Class C fires are fueled by electrical current traveling to wires, circuits, and outlets. Class C extinguishers most commonly use a dry chemical powder to smother the fire. In more sensitive environments such as a recording studio, a Class C extinguisher may use a halon gas that does not leave a residue. These are often referred to as clean agents. You would also never want to use water on a Class C fire for obvious reasons.

Most household extinguishers are a combination of Class A, B, and C ratings. These extinguishers can be used on ordinary combustible fires, liquid fires, and electrical fires.

The last of the four common classifications of fire is the Class D fire. The Class D fires fueled by combustible metals such as magnesium, potassium, and sodium. Class D fire extinguishers are used exclusively for Class D fires, and use materials such as sand, and dry chemical powders to smother the fire.

 

Special thanks to RVTCDEN who shared this video on Youtube.

 

And… Thank you Vince for your help! 😉

HOW to SURVIVE an AIRCRASH

 
This video shows how you can survive an airplane crash.
 
In case you are caught up in an air disaster situation, this is what you need:

  • an aisle seat or one close to it
  • long-sleeved pants and top;
  • and flat closed-toe shoes;
  • and a smoke hood or a wet washcloth

 
Click on the video hereafter:
 


 
If you need the transcript, it is available here: http://goo.gl/31kRo
 

FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT FALLOUT

Firefighters, as well as military personnel might be involved in a CRO (Crisis Response Operation – WARNING as this acronym has many other meanings in the military).

To whom it may concern, a short vocabulary review could be useful in case of (let’s hope you won’t deal with it) either natural disasters or a nuclear powerplant accident.

For instance:

  • « Fallout » is used in the headline above, and it means « consequences » but it also means « fallout » like in « radioactive/radiological fallout » (retombees radioactives/radiologiques)
  • NRBC (Nuclear, Radiological, Biological, and Chemical) or CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear)
  • Meltdown scenario = scenario de fusion du coeur du reacteur
  • Plume of smoke = Panache de fumee
  • Tidal wave, tsunami = Tsunami
  • Earthquake, quake = Tremblement de terre
  • Tremor = Secousse, replique
  • Shake, shaking = Secousse
  • Mud slide (prononcez [meud slaïd])/Land slide = Coulee de boue/Glissement de terrain
  • Flood/Flooding (prononcez [fleud] ou [fleuding]) = innondation
  • Fire/Arson = Incendie/Incendie criminel

…and so on. Watch, and listen carefully to this PBS News-Hour video:

  

New PICTURES of SMOKE over RUSSIA from satellite

Smoke over Russia Aug. 7, 2010
Smoke over Russia Aug. 7, 2010

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WARNING – The carbon monoxide level would be increasing dramatically in the Moscow region as well as in the capital center. According to some sources, hotspots rose up to 564. Italy and Ukraine promised aircraft to smother fires. France reportedly is about to provide some help as well.

WILDFIRE in Russia – 52 died, 3,500+ homeless – Missile attack warning center threatened by flames

Wildfire threatens Russian missile attack warning center

17:31 07/08/2010 Wildfire is threatening to engulf the military command of the Russian missile attack warning center in the Moscow region, a spokesman for Russian Space Forces said on Saturday.>>

Views hereafter – click on the satellite picture – NASA courtesy:

Fires nearing Moscow Aug 2010

According to some sources, more than 50 people would have died so far, almost 4,000 would be left, and the blazes keep on spreading. Foreign governments talk their citizens into avoiding travels to Russia. Airports could still operate with numerous delays due to the smog that has reduced visibility between 600 and 300 meters. However, latest news stated that it would not be possible to land on Moscow anymore. Fire hazard remains in remote areas as this smog can be breathed in, and would increase in hazard for health. Moreover, toxic elements would be in the air.

Italy and Ukraine should send aircraft in an attempt to smother fires..