FLAPERON CONTROL SYSTEM

FLAPERON CONTROL SYSTEMS view

Figure 1-5. – FLAPERON CONTROL SYSTEMS

  1. Wing fold flaperon interlock switch
  2. Flaperon control linkage
  3. Right wing flaperons
  4. Flaperon actuator (right wing)
  5. Flaperon pop-up valve
  6. Wing-fold‚ interlock mechanism
  7. Filter
  8. Crossover cables Flaperon pop-up mechanism and cylinder
  9. Left wing flaperons
  10. 1Flaperon control linkage
  11. Flaperon actuator (left wing)
  12. Crossover cables
  13. Pushrods Left wing flaperons
  14. Throttle quadrant

Longitudinal control systems control pitch about the lateral axis of the aircraft. Many aircraft use a conventional elevator system for this purpose. However, aircraft that operate in the higher speed ranges usually have a movable horizontal stabilizer. Both types of systems are discussed in the following text.

ELEVATOR CONTROL SYSTEM – A typical conventional elevator control system is operated by the control stick in the cockpit, and is hydraulically powered by the elevator power mechanism. The operation of the elevator control system is initiated when the control stick is moved fore or aft. When the stick is moved, it actuates the control cables that move the elevator control bell crank. The bell crank transmits the movement to the power mechanism through the control linkage. In turn, the power mechanism actuates a push-pull tube, which deflects the elevators up or down. If the hydraulic system fails, the cylinder can be disconnected. In this condition the controls work manually through the linkage of the mechanism to actuate the elevators.

HORIZONTAL STABILIZER CONTROL SYSTEM – Horizontal stabilizer control systems are given a variety of names by the various aircraft manufacturers. Some aircraft systems are defined as a unit horizontal tail (UHT) control systems, while others are labeled the stabilator control system. Regardless of the name, these systems function to control the aircraft pitch about its lateral axis.

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MAIN LANDING GEAR (MLG)

Aircraft main landing gear

Figure 1-11 Main landing gear. conventional  type.

The tricycle gear is more stable during ground operations and makes landing easier, especially in crosswinds. It also maintains the fuselage in a level position that increases the pilot’s visibility. Nearly all Navy aircraft are equipped with tricycle landing gear.

A main landing gear assembly is shown in figure 1-11. The major components of the assembly are the shock strut, tire, tube, wheel, brake assembly, retracting and extending mechanism, and side struts and supports. The shock strut absorbs the shock that otherwise would be sustained by the airframe structure during takeoff, taxiing, and landing. The air-oil shock strut is used on all Navy aircraft. This type of strut is composed essentially of two telescoping cylinders filled with hydraulic fluid and compressed air or nitrogen.

Source: http://www.tpub.com

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