NUCLEAR REACTOR MELTDOWN EXPLAINED

« Meltdown » means « the accidental melting of the core of a nuclear reactor », and literally after that, a large displacement of radiation throughout the entire atmosphere. Here is how it works (VIDEO):

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JAPANESE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT EXPLOSION

Japanese officials have just confirmed a radiation leak at Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant. A radiation level of 1,015 μSv/h (mircrosieverts per hour) has been measured near the plant before the blast. The situation is deemed almost as serious as the Three Mile Island partial reactor meltdown in the 70s, and the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. Cesium would have been detected. Therefore, the reactor number one might be having a meltdown.

The U.S. is sending special coolant. Four workers have been injured. The cordoned-off area has been widened to a 20km-radius zone. The roof of the reactor would have collapsed in the aftermath of the explosion. A scram (shutdown) might not be achieved on another reactor because of a glitch in the emergency cooling system.

VIDEO:

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Svetlana KAPANINA – Queen of the skies

The Russian pilot Svetlana KAPANINA, has won up to 39 gold medals, two World Air Games, and seven World Championship titles – a record in women category.

Among her feats, she is used to challenging the best male pilots in the world as she has reached the top 4 – and even top 2 – several times in overall competition. Finally, she has been awarded a prestigious medal for being the best pilot of the century.

According to her performance on the videos above, she deserves her nickname « Queen of the skies ». Just watch and enjoy…

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Tidal waves being reported in Pacific

WARNING: Tidal waves are being reported in the Pacific area, which means that tsunamis are on the making, and can threaten Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, China, Hawaii, Easter Island, and other islands in the Pacific. Some waves would have already reached up to 2.4 meters above normal sea level off Chilean coasts.

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