FLIGHT RADIOTELEPHONY VARIANTS

GREAT VIDEO – Watch for pleasure, first. Listen carefully to the figures and phrases uttered and compare with the various texts that are enforced in the world, and in Europe. In such an extreme situation, you may understand that the procedures are turned into a faster phraseology. So, why not adopt it in GAT (General Air Traffic), after all? 😉

SUPERBE VIDÉO: Regardez d’abord pour le plaisir. Écoutez attentivement les chiffres et expressions et comparez les avec les textes en vigueur dans le monde et en Europe. Dans une situation aussi extrême, on peut comprendre que les procédures se fassent plus rapidement dans la phraséologie. Alors pourquoi ne pas l’adopter dans la CAG (Circulation Aérienne Générale), après tout? 😉

GENERAL ENGLISH – HAPPY ST PATRICK’S DAY!

https://youtu.be/x7Ahgnpf3G4 about Saint Patrick’s Day

Who was the real St. Patrick?

VOCABULARY:

  • Saint Paddy’s Day = Saint Patrick’s Day
  • Leprechaun, pronounce [ˈlɛpɹəkɔːn]; lutin farceur, cordonnier, génie, qui fait partie du folklore irlandais
  • Shamrock: trèfle (attention, aux cartes, on dit « king of clubs » pour « roi de trèfle »
  • Pinching people who forget to wear green: pincer des gens qui oublient de s’habiller en vert.
  • Slavery: esclavage
  • Monk: moine
  • Gospel: parole d’Evangile
  • The very people: ceux-là mêmes

F-111 SHED WHEEL !

An RAAF F-111 crew had to perform a belly landing. To help you understand this video in Australian English, there is information both in English and French below:

To shed / I shed / have shed: perdre quelquechose. Attention, « a shed » = un hangar, un abri, aussi un cabanon.
To shed a tear: verser une larme.
Masterpiece: Chef d’oeuvre, joyau, merveille.
Beneath: Sous, dessous.
« The F-111 can dump and ignite fuel with the afterburners »: Le F-111 peut larguer et allumer le carburant avec la postcombustion (PC).
« This extreme war machine can be fickle »: Fickle = capricieux, instable, imprévisible.
In Aussie (in Australian, say [ozy]) language: Brake mechanism, (dites [braïk mekeunizeum]) mécanisme de freinage; Air base (dites [ èr bâïss ]); Formation [Formaïsheun].
All, as per normal = Comme d’habitude.
« A wheel has fallen off, which was quite surreal in the circumstances… »: surreal = surréaliste, étrange, onirique.
Stricken plane: l’avion n’et pas nécessairement abattu par un projectile, il peut être en perdition, touché ou endommagé pour une autre raison. On pourrait presque dire « avion en perdition » comme pour « doomed aircraft ».
To devise a plan: Concevoir, inventer, imaginer, élaborer un plan.
« They are spot on »: Ils sont parfaits.

PILOT ESCAPING THROUGH UNDERWATER EJECTION

Do you remember that some fighter pilots could safely eject from underwater back in 1965? Could it be survived? One may wonder but a few ejections were reported. The transcript is below the video. Look at that canopy, it looks like it came from an F-8 Crusader:

TRANSCRIPT:

If your aircraft has provision for underwater ejection, you have a ready-made, secondary escape route. Succesful underwater ejections can be made from any aircraft attitude – nose down, tail down, and inverted.

Escape by this method requires no preparation other than that recommended for normal seat ejection. There should be at least ten feet of water above you before you can safely eject. Never eject from the surface. With present systems, the chute cannot open with a zero-zero situation (which means at a height of 0 and at a speed of 0). The effect of free-falling 80 feet to water is little different than falling 80 feet to concrete. True, some lucky ones have lived to tell about it. But it is one hell of a gamble.

When you eject through the canopy underwater, the seat breaks through clearing the way for your body. Because water resistance imposes terrific forces on your head and neck, it is vital to hold the face curtain tight against your head for support. The forces of ejection might cause a momentary blackout. Immediately upon collecting your wits, disconnect yourself from the seat by pulling the emergency release handle breaking your restraints. Now, separate yourself from the seat. This is difficult. You will have to kick and swim violently even though you are disconnected.

If your chute gets hung up on the seat, do not waste time trying to clear it. Release your riser fittings and swim clear off the chute. Do not inflate flotation equipment until clear of the seat. Remember, surface slowly, exhaling as you go. Remove your oxygen mask.

SCHIPOL INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IS 100 YEARS OLD

Feb 14, 2016 – The Dutch airport will be one hundred years old in September this year. It used to be a military airfield on a meadow surrounded by a few huts. It has become one of the major airports in the world. The video here below might have been used for an Air-English examination. Let us play with questions – number 1 – according to the video, when was Schipol airport completely destroyed? Number 2 – Could you quote two major improvements that happened in the 1980s? Watch the video:

 

 

 

 

Here are the answers:

 

 
Number 1: Schipol was completely destroyed during World War 2. (listen again at 00’19 »)

Number 2: As far as the 1980s are concerned, you have got the choice between (listen again at 00’47 »):

  • The airport apron was expanded;
  • The terminal became bigger;
  • The area was beautified;
  • In time, piers and railway connections were added.