Flight safety in question after guilty verdict in Concorde crash

On 6 December 2010, Continental Airlines was found criminally responsible for the disaster by a Parisian court and was fined € 200,000 and ordered to pay Air France € 1 million. Continental mechanic John Taylor was given a 15-month suspended sentence, while another airline operative and three French officials were cleared of all charges. The court ruled that the crash resulted from a piece of metal from a Continental jet that was left on the runway; the object punctured a tyre on the Concorde and then ruptured a fuel tank. Another Continental employee, Stanley Ford, was found not guilty. Continental’s lawyer, Olivier Metzner, said it would appeal the verdict.

The court also ruled that Continental would have to pay 70% of any compensation claims. As Air France has paid out € 100 million to the families of the victims, Continental could be made to pay its share of that compensation payout. Source – Wikipedia

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Sudanese AF cracked down on Darfur with Chinese A-5 warplanes in 2008

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Aircraft on USS Nimitz

As you can see the French Navy E-2 Hawkeye 2000 on this picture (below), the E-2 has evolved into an eight-bladed-propeller and glass-cockpit version. The photo was shot by Xavier (http://passiondesavions.blogspot.com/) from La Ferté Allais Airshow in May 2010.

E-2 Hawkeye at La Ferté Allais airshow in 2010
E-2 Hawkeye 2000 - © Xavier Cotton, http://passiondesavions.blogspot.de/
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Jet engine washing

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F-15 rewire flight

www.af.mil courtesy

by Wayne Crenshaw
78th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

1/19/2010 – ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. – A new rewire flight at Robins is playing a key role in keeping the aging F-15 Eagle flying for years to come.

The flight will perform a complete rewire on 122 F-15s during the next five years. The rewiring will be done on C and D models, and when complete, the flight will spend at least another five years working on E models.

Keith Gilstrap, the rewire flight chief, said the reason for the rewire is that the insulation on the existing wire is getting brittle and causing shorts. Although it has not caused any crashes, it has led to a significant amount of field repair time and false troubleshooting, as technicians try to figure out why aircraft systems fail intermittently, he said.

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