RED BULL AIR RACE – ABU DHABI 2017

Czech Pilot Wins First Race

The 2017 opener has been full of surprises. A victory of Mathias Dolderer was expected in Abu Dhabi today but the Czech Martin Sonka and his Zivko Edge 540 V3 had the last word thanks to his first victory in this competition. The German champion finished fourth. Two French pilots – Nicolas Ivanoff and François Le Vot – reached the Final 8 but failed to go through. Master Class results: Sonka (CZE) 15 points, Velarde (ESP) 12 pts, McLeod (CAN) 9 pts, Dolderer (GER) 7 pts, Ivanoff (FRA) 6 pts, Goulian (USA) 5 pts, Bolton (CHI) 4 pts, Le Vot (FRA) 3 pts, Brageot (FRA) 2 pts, Hall (AUS) 1 pt. The next race is to be hold in San Diego on April 15 & 16.

RED BULL AIR RACE – 2 FRENCH PILOTS ON PODIUM

The French took the lead through Nicolas IVANOFF and François LE VOT in this season-opening air race in Abu Dhabi, UAE on Saturday, March 12, 2016. Ivanoff finished first after a narrow victory since the German Matthias DOLDERER was only 0.110″ behind him. The RBAR biggest surprise came from LE VOT who finished third. It is the first time he has been on the podium. The Australian Matt HALL could not perform as expected as he hit a pylon during the opening round. The Austrian Hannes ARCH was disqualified for surprisingly flying off track. The next race should fit him better since it will be in Spielberg, Austria on April 23rd and 24th.

2016 MASTER CLASS CHAMPIONSHIP RANKING – 1st Race :

  1. FRA – Nicolas IVANOFF, 15 points
  2. GER – Matthias DOLDERER, 12 points
  3. FRA – François LE VOT, 9 points
  4. USA – Kirby CHAMBLISS, 6 points
  5. USA – Michael GOULIAN, 5 points

MUST SEE – WEIRD TAKEOFF EXPLAINED

Thanks to this video shared by @air_english, here is an example of the kind of accident you can avoid if you follow some basic flight safety rules. Even if nobody could expect such a spectacular accident while weather and visibility were excellent, some precautionary measures could have prevented the aircrew from a catastrophic failure. This video will let you guess what provoked this. You will find an analysis of this German Robin DR-400 accident here.

Thanks to AIR-ENGLISH and John Maxwell. Please, pass the information on for it is a flight safety issue and it could happen to anybody. It is useful for BIA-CAEA too.

PILOT ESCAPING THROUGH UNDERWATER EJECTION

Do you remember that some fighter pilots could safely eject from underwater back in 1965? Could it be survived? One may wonder but a few ejections were reported. The transcript is below the video. Look at that canopy, it looks like it came from an F-8 Crusader:

TRANSCRIPT:

If your aircraft has provision for underwater ejection, you have a ready-made, secondary escape route. Succesful underwater ejections can be made from any aircraft attitude – nose down, tail down, and inverted.

Escape by this method requires no preparation other than that recommended for normal seat ejection. There should be at least ten feet of water above you before you can safely eject. Never eject from the surface. With present systems, the chute cannot open with a zero-zero situation (which means at a height of 0 and at a speed of 0). The effect of free-falling 80 feet to water is little different than falling 80 feet to concrete. True, some lucky ones have lived to tell about it. But it is one hell of a gamble.

When you eject through the canopy underwater, the seat breaks through clearing the way for your body. Because water resistance imposes terrific forces on your head and neck, it is vital to hold the face curtain tight against your head for support. The forces of ejection might cause a momentary blackout. Immediately upon collecting your wits, disconnect yourself from the seat by pulling the emergency release handle breaking your restraints. Now, separate yourself from the seat. This is difficult. You will have to kick and swim violently even though you are disconnected.

If your chute gets hung up on the seat, do not waste time trying to clear it. Release your riser fittings and swim clear off the chute. Do not inflate flotation equipment until clear of the seat. Remember, surface slowly, exhaling as you go. Remove your oxygen mask.

ATC SAVED HYPOXIC PILOT

This Dallas Fort Worth air traffic controller well deserved her NATCA award two years ago. Had she not responded quickly, the pilot would have passed out on board his Piaggio P180 Avanti (registration N501PM, callsign shortened into N1PM) and could even have passed away. Another pilot was alerted by slurring in the pilot’s speech. Video: