CIAS 2011 – Canadian International Air Show

The Canadian International Air Show took place in Toronto last month.

The CIAS line-up featured the RCAF (Royal Canadian Air Force) Snowbirds; CF-18 Hornets; US Marine tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey; USAF A-10 Thunderbolt; the American team Heavy Metal, and its L-39 Albatross & a T-33 Shooting Star; a Pitts Special S-1-11B SS or Model 11 « Super Stinker »; an Avro Lancaster; the CFB Trenton SkyHawks – the Canadian Forces Parachute Demonstration Team; a Zivko Edge 540 flown by Pete McLeod; the Misty Blues all woman skydiving team; a Sukhoi SU-26M flown by Rick Volker; an H-101 Salto sailplane flown by Manfred Radius; and the Royal Canadian Air Cadets on the Bellanca 8GCBC Scout tow plane and the Schweizer SGS 2-33A Glider.

Watch the video with interviews:

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When mice take the Mickey out of airline…

Mouse in commercial aircraft
Mouse - Photo © George Shuklin, Wikimedia.org

It first happened on Monday September 5, 2011. A Nepal Airlines flight was cancelled at Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu.

Do you guess why? The flight attendants spotted a stowaway mouse onboard their B-757 bound to Bangkok! The small rodent fled from the galley’s pantry, and rushed from a box of drinks to the back of the cabin although the 113 passengers did not notice the tiny stowaway.

The mouse was finally caught thanks to a glue trap. The jetliner was grounded for more than eleven hours.

 

Then, the same Boeing 757 – this time bound to Kathmandu – was grounded at Hong Kong International Airport on Tuesday September 6, in the evening.

The reason: the pilots spotted a mouse in the cockpit just before the airplane departure. The aircraft has not been cleared to take off because this mouse was trapped but then escaped, and would still be on the loose. The 84 passengers were rerouted on a Dragonair aircraft.

 

As far as flight safety is concerned, an aircraft cannot take off with a mouse moving freely onboard as it can gnaw the wiring, and therefore represents a potentiel danger.

It can only be caught or trapped. However, NAC (Nepal Airlines Corporation) could not poison any mouse for a small animal can damage an airplane even if it is dead somewhere, and particularly if in contact with a vital part of the plane.

 

Special thanks to Mr Hermas, and LadyEleanorA who buzzed this piece of news.

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HOLDING PATTERN & TEARDROP ENTRY REMARKABLY EXPLAINED

A holding pattern is nothing more than a big oval formed in a race-track shape that is designed to keep an aircraft in a specified space for a specified amount of time. A holding pattern can be published on either airway charts or terminal charts or can be unpublished, and specified by the air traffic controller. Watch the video (from 1’49 »):

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ICAO Air Traffic Radiotelephony – Transmitting Numbers

Here is an audio/video file with transcript about how the numbers must be pronounced according to the ICAO (International Civilian Aviation Organization) standard. This is how aircrew members, and air traffic controllers should transmit the numbers.

CAUTION – There is not any exception for FL 100, and FL 200 according to the ICAO DOC 9432 Radiotelephony Manual, page 19, chapter 2.4.2, as it is pronounced « FLIGHT LEVEL ONE-ZERO-ZERO », and « FLIGHT LEVEL TWO-ZERO-ZERO ».
However, « Flight level one hundred » follows the French DGAC and the British CAA patterns.

Click on this video:

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Rio-Paris Flight 447 Crash – INTERESTING Point of View particularly on Highly AUTOMATED AIRCRAFT

Watch and listen carefully to Mr. Learmount’s point of view which has been deemed to be of considerable interest as far as the 2009 AF 447 crash is concerned. Please notice that there are interesting acronyms such as GIGO (Garbage in – Garbage out), and LOC – if it is well known as « Loss of Consciousness » – means « Loss of Control » here. Special thanks to Xavier Cotton (Passion pour l’aviation webmaster) who has found out this video:

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