LC-130 takes off for Operation Deep Freeze

Master Sgt. Joseph Sinatra checks the air spring pressure on an LC-130 Hercules during a stop Oct. 18, 2010, at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The springs are used to absorb the shock of landing the ski-equipped aircraft on the Antarctic ice. Sergeant Sinatra and the rest of his LC-130 aircrew stopped at Hickam while en route to Antarctica to support Operation Deep Freeze, the Defense Department’s logistical support to U.S. research activities at the southernmost continent. Sergeant Sinatra is an LC-130 crew chief assigned to the New York Air National Guard’s 109th Airlift Wing at Stratton Air National Guard Base, N.Y. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Kerry Jackson).
US Air Force Link (www.af.mil) courtesy

LC-130 taking off with JATO from Greenland
LC-130 taking off with JATO from Greenland – Photo © Søren Wedel Nielsen (Copyright 2005)
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Sea King helicopter blade

Sea King helicopter blade cutaway view
Rotary-wing blade - Figure 1-17 © www.tpub.com

The main rotor or rotary wing on the H-3 has five identical wing blades. Other helicopters may have two, three, or four blades. A typical wing blade is shown in figure 1-17. The rotary-wing blade is made of aluminum alloy, except the steel cuff by which the blade attaches to the rotor hub. The main supporting member of the blade is a hollow, aluminum alloy extruded spar, which forms the leading edge. The steel cuff is bolted to the root end of the spar. Twenty-three individual pockets constructed of aluminum ribs, aluminum channels, and aluminum skin covering are bonded to the aft edge of the spar.

Text and cutaway view: www.tpub.com courtesy

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F-16 Fighting Falcon’s updates

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Russian Air Traffic Controllers at work

How do air traffic controllers direct flights?

21:26 20/10/2010 What is an air traffic controller’s job from taking off to landing?>>

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Oustanding views from homemade spacecraft!

This video features an American family that managed to send a balloon into space – up to 100,000 feet – and retrieve its camera which shot outstanding views from the upper stratosphere. Special thanks to Xavier (http://passiondesavions.blogspot.com) who provided the link to this amazing footage:

Homemade Spacecraft from Luke Geissbuhler on Vimeo.

Video from a camera attached to a weather balloon that rose into the
upper stratosphere and recorded the blackness of space.

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