LC-130 takes off for Operation Deep Freeze

Master Sgt. Joseph Sinatra checks the air spring pressure on an LC-130 Hercules during a stop Oct. 18, 2010, at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The springs are used to absorb the shock of landing the ski-equipped aircraft on the Antarctic ice. Sergeant Sinatra and the rest of his LC-130 aircrew stopped at Hickam while en route to Antarctica to support Operation Deep Freeze, the Defense Department’s logistical support to U.S. research activities at the southernmost continent. Sergeant Sinatra is an LC-130 crew chief assigned to the New York Air National Guard’s 109th Airlift Wing at Stratton Air National Guard Base, N.Y. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Kerry Jackson).
US Air Force Link (www.af.mil) courtesy

LC-130 taking off with JATO from Greenland
LC-130 taking off with JATO from Greenland – Photo © Søren Wedel Nielsen (Copyright 2005)
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Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird documentary


Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird par AllThingsScience

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MAIN LANDING GEAR (MLG)

Aircraft main landing gear

Figure 1-11 Main landing gear. conventional  type.

The tricycle gear is more stable during ground operations and makes landing easier, especially in crosswinds. It also maintains the fuselage in a level position that increases the pilot’s visibility. Nearly all Navy aircraft are equipped with tricycle landing gear.

A main landing gear assembly is shown in figure 1-11. The major components of the assembly are the shock strut, tire, tube, wheel, brake assembly, retracting and extending mechanism, and side struts and supports. The shock strut absorbs the shock that otherwise would be sustained by the airframe structure during takeoff, taxiing, and landing. The air-oil shock strut is used on all Navy aircraft. This type of strut is composed essentially of two telescoping cylinders filled with hydraulic fluid and compressed air or nitrogen.

Source: http://www.tpub.com

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