LANDING – HOW DIFFICULT IT CAN BE…

 

WarningThis voice communication does not comply with the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) recommendations. However, you can click off, and listen without reading the script on this video in order to jot down this radio communication for listening training purpose:

 

Waterbury-Oxford Airport Map

Click on the map above to enlarge. (U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration courtesy via Wikimedia)

 

These things happen.

  1. Bearing reported with a ninety-degree error, then corrected;
  2. Uncertainty of the downwind leg;
  3. Traffic not in sight;
  4. Uncertainty as to which airport is in sight;
  5. Requests are said again;
  6. Another airport in the vicinity with same runway configuration;
  7. Traffic off course;
  8. Within half a mile, no traffic in sight, and no radar tracking;
  9. Pilot cannot hear at times or does not reply;
  10. Confusion between ident and squawk;
  11. Pilot does not know how to use the transponder;
  12. Uncertainty of the type of aircraft, then corrected.

Landings may be difficult at times, indeed…

ICAO Air Traffic Radiotelephony – Transmitting Numbers

Here is an audio/video file with transcript about how the numbers must be pronounced according to the ICAO (International Civilian Aviation Organization) standard. This is how aircrew members, and air traffic controllers should transmit the numbers.

CAUTION – There is not any exception for FL 100, and FL 200 according to the ICAO DOC 9432 Radiotelephony Manual, page 19, chapter 2.4.2, as it is pronounced « FLIGHT LEVEL ONE-ZERO-ZERO », and « FLIGHT LEVEL TWO-ZERO-ZERO ».
However, « Flight level one hundred » follows the French DGAC and the British CAA patterns.

Click on this video:

Cockpit overview

This is a remarkable video provided from ANGLE of ATTACK thanks to Chris Palmer who spreads a wealth of knowledge through aviation on his blog AVIATOR 90. You can watch a brilliant description on the video below:

Aviator90 Episode 5- Cockpit from Chris Palmer on Vimeo.

Aviator90 is a basic virtual flight simulator training course from Angle of Attack for FSX, FS9 and other simulation. Aviator90 is 90 Days, 45 Lessons, and ALL FREE. To learn more go to www.flyAOAmedia.com/blog

In this episode we discuss many parts of the cockpit to start to get you familiar with the controls, switches, and instruments.

« Until next time, throttle on… »