HOLDING PATTERN & TEARDROP ENTRY REMARKABLY EXPLAINED

A holding pattern is nothing more than a big oval formed in a race-track shape that is designed to keep an aircraft in a specified space for a specified amount of time. A holding pattern can be published on either airway charts or terminal charts or can be unpublished, and specified by the air traffic controller. Watch the video (from 1’49 »):

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Rio-Paris Flight 447 Crash – INTERESTING Point of View particularly on Highly AUTOMATED AIRCRAFT

Watch and listen carefully to Mr. Learmount’s point of view which has been deemed to be of considerable interest as far as the 2009 AF 447 crash is concerned. Please notice that there are interesting acronyms such as GIGO (Garbage in – Garbage out), and LOC – if it is well known as « Loss of Consciousness » – means « Loss of Control » here. Special thanks to Xavier Cotton (Passion pour l’aviation webmaster) who has found out this video:

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Cockpit overview

This is a remarkable video provided from ANGLE of ATTACK thanks to Chris Palmer who spreads a wealth of knowledge through aviation on his blog AVIATOR 90. You can watch a brilliant description on the video below:

Aviator90 Episode 5- Cockpit from Chris Palmer on Vimeo.

Aviator90 is a basic virtual flight simulator training course from Angle of Attack for FSX, FS9 and other simulation. Aviator90 is 90 Days, 45 Lessons, and ALL FREE. To learn more go to www.flyAOAmedia.com/blog

In this episode we discuss many parts of the cockpit to start to get you familiar with the controls, switches, and instruments.

« Until next time, throttle on… »

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

FLAPERON CONTROL SYSTEM

FLAPERON CONTROL SYSTEMS view

Figure 1-5. – FLAPERON CONTROL SYSTEMS

  1. Wing fold flaperon interlock switch
  2. Flaperon control linkage
  3. Right wing flaperons
  4. Flaperon actuator (right wing)
  5. Flaperon pop-up valve
  6. Wing-fold‚ interlock mechanism
  7. Filter
  8. Crossover cables Flaperon pop-up mechanism and cylinder
  9. Left wing flaperons
  10. 1Flaperon control linkage
  11. Flaperon actuator (left wing)
  12. Crossover cables
  13. Pushrods Left wing flaperons
  14. Throttle quadrant

Longitudinal control systems control pitch about the lateral axis of the aircraft. Many aircraft use a conventional elevator system for this purpose. However, aircraft that operate in the higher speed ranges usually have a movable horizontal stabilizer. Both types of systems are discussed in the following text.

ELEVATOR CONTROL SYSTEM – A typical conventional elevator control system is operated by the control stick in the cockpit, and is hydraulically powered by the elevator power mechanism. The operation of the elevator control system is initiated when the control stick is moved fore or aft. When the stick is moved, it actuates the control cables that move the elevator control bell crank. The bell crank transmits the movement to the power mechanism through the control linkage. In turn, the power mechanism actuates a push-pull tube, which deflects the elevators up or down. If the hydraulic system fails, the cylinder can be disconnected. In this condition the controls work manually through the linkage of the mechanism to actuate the elevators.

HORIZONTAL STABILIZER CONTROL SYSTEM – Horizontal stabilizer control systems are given a variety of names by the various aircraft manufacturers. Some aircraft systems are defined as a unit horizontal tail (UHT) control systems, while others are labeled the stabilator control system. Regardless of the name, these systems function to control the aircraft pitch about its lateral axis.

Source: http://www.tpub.com

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Jabiru J170

Please, visit jabiruna.com, and www.bydanjohnson.com for more information.

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail