HILARIOUS – Voice-activity elevator

Special thanks to LadyEleanorA who found out this great video.

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

WWI REMEMBRANCE DAY

WW1 remembrance flanders book
Flanders Fields Poem, John McCrae - Photo © Wikipedia user: Lx_121

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae (1872-1918) – Ypres battlefield 1915. Photo: Lx 121Wikipedia courtesy

The WWI armistice came into effect at the eleventh hour (Paris time) of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. The War to End All Wars left 37,000,000 casualties – 16 million deaths and 21 million wounded. The Allies lost 5.7 million soldiers. May their souls rest in peace

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Oustanding views from homemade spacecraft!

This video features an American family that managed to send a balloon into space – up to 100,000 feet – and retrieve its camera which shot outstanding views from the upper stratosphere. Special thanks to Xavier (http://passiondesavions.blogspot.com) who provided the link to this amazing footage:

Homemade Spacecraft from Luke Geissbuhler on Vimeo.

Video from a camera attached to a weather balloon that rose into the
upper stratosphere and recorded the blackness of space.

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Pilot survives race plane accident at Reno

Special thanks again to Xavier (http://passiondesavions.blogspot.com) who provided the links to these videos.

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

A MUST in chivalry history – When Guynemer spared Udet after strafing through his wing

Here is a tribute to CPT Georges GUYNEMER who was killed in action on September 11th, 1917. Three months earlier, he fought with Ernst Udet, the ace who came up 2nd after the Red Baron. You can watch hereafter how this dogfight reportedly happened, and how these fighter pilots had the gut to keep honor above all:


Georges Guynemer, French Air Force pilot and WWI ace
Georges Guynemer by "Lucien" - Jebulon https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jebulon

Remember Guynemer’s mottos: FAIRE FACE (face up to it) was then adopted by the French Air Force Academy (FAFA) as their motto. A few words that well expresses the French pilots’ bravery.

The WWI French ace Georges Guynemer used to say:

– « Il y a une limite à toute chose, et il faut toujours la dépasser. « Everything has a limit which has always got to be surpassed. »
– « Lorsque l’on n’a pas tout donné, on n’a rien donné. » « As long as you have not given your all, you have given nothing »

Loyal to these principles, the French ace took part in several hundreds of aerial combats, crediting 53 victories. He was shot down seven times, and he was admired for he always survived, but that September 11, Ninety-three years ago. The hero took off once again. Outnumbered by German warplanes in a last dogfighting over Belgium. Then, he fell.

Since then, the French Air Force aviators have worn a black tie in sign of mourning.

RIP

Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail