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Among Greatest Pilots – Maxime LENOIR Destiny

Maxime LENOIR - 11-victory ace in 1916

Maxime LENOIR – 11-victory ace in 1916 – was not born in Paris but Chargé, in the Loire Valley

December 22, 2014

Maxime LENOIR would have been 116 years old today. 116, like his aircraft registration number up on the fin of his legendary SPAD VII tagged “Trompe la mort III” which meant “death-dodger”.

Lenoir, Navarre, Guynemer, and Nungesser - WW1 Aces

Lenoir, Navarre, Guynemer, and Nungesser – WW1 Aces

He used to be one of the most renowned and talented pilots. He had been an aviation pioneer as he was among the very first pilots who performed the famous “looping the loop” aerobatic manoeuvre in the trail of Adolphe Pégoud between 1913 and 1914. He took part in a few air races, and a lot of air shows on his Blériot XI, nicknamed “Backjumper”. The local, national, and international press started to write articles about his prodigal sense of flying in the numerous airshows as the spectators cheered him every time he showed up. For instance, he was carried in triumph after he performed aerobatic manoeuvres above the “La Girardière” airfield in Chargé, his home village where up to 5,000 people were gathered to attend his air show in May 1914.

Lenoir was rising to fame when Archduke Franz-Ferdinand was murdered and as the “European war” broke out, he joined up shortly after. In spite of his exceptional flying skills, Maxime Lenoir was unfortunately compelled to join the French cavalry. He then kept on requesting an assignment in the brand new military aeronautics recently created by General Hirschauer, and became a fighter pilot. However, he was first posted to the target-shooting department at the C18 flight, then he was transferred to the N23 flight as a fighter pilot. He waged a devastating war over the trenches, and against the Prussian aviation in fierce air battles over Verdun. He tested new weapons, and airplanes. After a few victories in 1915, he became the N23’s best fighter pilot, and most decorated among prestigious names – Pinsard, Casale, Gilbert, de Beauchamp, Rochechouart de Mortemart, Brindejonc des Moulinais, Roland Garros, Pulpe (from Russia), Baumont, etc. He was the best ace in his flight, and even reached the top four French aces in 1916 as he remained in the top-two aces in the summer of that year.

Maxime Lenoir looping the loop and airshows - early 1914

Maxime Lenoir looping the loop and airshows – early 1914

According to German soldiers’ testimony, Lenoir was a very skillful and fearsome ace. They knew him well as they knew Navarre, Nungesser, Guynemer, Dorme, and Boelcke, of course. It is important to note that Mannock, Collishaw, Bishop, Löwenhardt, Little, Udet, McCudden, Fonck, Von Richthofen, Beauchamp-Proctor, and McLaren were not so famous at that time for some of them were not aces or did not have so many victories. Air war between 1914 and 1916 was totally different from 1917/1918. As Lenoir had trained at Blériot’s Buc airfield, the best aerobatic flying school, he was able to cope with a jammed machine gun and dodge the enemy fire. Like a toreador, and in a very skillful way, he could lure the enemy pilots when his

fellow pilots were under heavy fire. He was the best bullet dodger but took a lot of risks, too much maybe. He flew back to Vadelaincourt airfield with his aircraft crippled with bullets many times. He never hesitated to help his fellow pilots whenever he could since he dared to face up to several German airplanes in a row. He was deemed to be a very good friend, as well as salvation in the sky of Verdun. For instance, when he learnt that his friend Navarre (nicknamed “Verdun’s sentinel”) had been shot down and seriously wounded on June 17th, 1916, he took off immediately. Alone, he made for the location where his friend had been downed, and dashed to an LVG C that he shot down without delay. He became so famous that candy wrappers, and stamps featured either his name or his portrait among the greatest aces in the hall of fame.

GUYNEMER, LENOIR, GARROS - 1916

GUYNEMER, LENOIR, GARROS – 1916

Maxime Lenoir had more than a hundred war missions, which was considerable at that time. Wounded twice in air combat, he kept on dogfighting. He took off the day after the take back of Fort Douaumont, wrecked havoc by the battle. He was reported absent on October 25th, 1916, at night then MIA (missed in action) until much later when he was declared “Dead for France”. However, he has never been found despite extensive searching.

DORME & LENOIR - 1916 Candy Wrapper

DORME & LENOIR – 1916 Candy Wrapper

Unfortunately, this is why aviation history forgot him for almost a century. One of the most brilliant pilots had disappeared from World War 1 history. He remained all the same in a few books in English, and Jacques Mortane, the French journalist left several publications highlighting the role of Maxime Lenoir in aviation and air combat. Then nothing, almost nothing written on this pilot who was awarded the Legion d’honneur, Médaille militaire, Croix de guerre, as well as the notorious Aeroclub of America, and Aeroclub of France gold medals!

Only two men kept his remembrance alive – first, Abel Anjorand who has always been a long-time friend of Lenoir’s family. He compiled a set of documents and pictures to leave a trace of the village’s ace to future generations. Didier Lecoq, a journalist and historian, has revealed Maxime Lenoir’s feats on his website aeroplanedetouraine.fr for a few years. The WW1 ace could have stayed hidden for possibly a couple more decades without Didier Lecoq’s outstanding work. Didier Lecoq rightly pointed out that there is no building, no square, and no street called Maxime Lenoir.

Lenoir congratulated by British officers

Lenoir congratulated by British officers

Last not least, there is good news since the national and regional officials have officially recognized Maxime Lenoir as the WW1 hero for Tours and Indre-et-Loire in the remembrance operation called “100 cities, 100 heroes, and 100 flags” since last summer. A ceremony to pay tribute to the local hero was held in the capital of Touraine, Place Anatole France on the left bank of the Loire river on Friday, September 19th, 2014. The Lenoir’s family, their friends and some veterans attended the ceremony which ended in the majestic festival hall at the city hall.

Maxime Lenoir’s disappearance in history handbooks for almost a century remains a mystery. Moreover, avgeeks, online gamers as well as modelists used Lenoir’s features “Trompe la mort III”, “Max”, and “Backjumper” tagged from markings just along with Guynemer’s “Vieux Charles”. No wonder if Maxime Lenoir recovered his position in aviation history for at least two books featuring the former ace are to be published between 2015 and 2016 – and quite rightly so. Among the 100 WW1 heroes, Maxime Lenoir turns out to be the 5th ace in victories out of 21 other aces, and the second “Dead for France” ace after… Guynemer!

———–

En français:

Maxime Lenoir & Nieuport - summer 1916

Maxime Lenoir & Nieuport – summer 1916

Maxime LENOIR aurait eu 116 ans aujourd’hui. 116 comme le numéro de série sur l’empennage vertical de son légendaire SPAD VII marqué du surnom ”Trompe la mort III”.

Il fût autrefois un des plus connus et talentueux pilotes de sa génération. Il avait été pionnier de l’aviation alors qu’il faisait partie de ces quelques pilotes capable d’accomplir des boucles en voltige à la suite d’Adolphe Pégoud entre 1913 et 1914. Il s’engagea dans quelques courses d’avions et de nombreux meetings aériens sur son Blériot XI surnommé ”Backjumper”. La presse locale, nationale et internationale commença à publier des articles sur son sens prodigue du pilotage dans les nombreux meetings aériens étant donné que les spectateurs l’acclamaient à chaque fois qu’il se produisait. Par exemple, il fût porté en triomphe après avoir avoir accompli des figures acrobatiques au-dessus du terrain d’aviation de “La Girardière” à Chargé son village natal où jusqu’à 5000 personnes s’étaient rassemblées pour assister à son show aérien en mai 1914.

Alors que la notoriété de Lenoir était croissante, l’archiduc François-Ferdinand fût assassiné et la ”Guerre européenne” éclata. Il s’engagea dans l’armée peu de temps après. Malgré ses compétences exceptionnelles en tant que pilote, Maxime Lenoir fût malheureusement contraint de rejoindre la cavalerie française. Il continua ensuite à demander une mutation vers l’Aéronautique militaire récemment créée par le général Hirschauer et devint pilote de chasse. Toutefois il fût d’abord affecté au réglage du tir à l’escadrille C18, puis il fût affecté à l’escadrille N23 comme pilote de chasse. Il mena une guerre terrible au dessus des tranchées et engagea des combats aériens acharnés contre l’aviation prussienne au dessus de Verdun. Après quelques victoires en 1915, il devint le meilleur pilote de chasse de la N23, ainsi que le plus décoré parmi des noms prestigieux : Pinsard, Casale, Gilbert, de Beauchamp, Rochechouart de Mortemart, Brindejonc des Moulinais, Roland Garros, Pulpe (venant de Russie), Baumont, etc.

D’après des témoignages de soldats allemand, Lenoir était un as très adroit et redoutable. Ils le connaissaient comme ils connaissaient Navarre, Nungesser, Guynemer, Dorme et bien sûr Boelcke. Il est important de rappeler que Mannock, Collishaw, Bishop, Löwenhardt, Little, Udet, McCudden, Fonck, Von Richthofen, Beauchamp-Proctor, and McLaren n’étaient pas aussi célèbres à ce moment là car certains d’entre eux n’étaient pas des as ou ne comptaient pas autant de victoires. La guerre aérienne entre 1914 et 1916 était totalement différente de celle menée entre 1917 et 1918. Comme Lenoir avait été formé au terrain d’aviation de Buc chez Blériot, la meilleure école d’acrobatie aérienne, il parvenait à échapper au feu ennemi lorsque sa mitrailleuse s’enrayait. Comme un toréador et de façon très habile, il savait comment leurrer les aéroplanes ennemis lorsque ses camarades pilotes subissaient un feu nourri. C’était le roi de l’esquive mais il prenait beaucoup de risques, trop peut-être. Il revint plusieurs fois au terrain de Vadelaincourt son avion criblé de balles. Il n’hésitait jamais à voler au secours de ses camarades pilotes à chaque fois qu’il le pouvait puisqu’il osait faire face à plusieurs appareils allemands d’affilée. Il avait la réputation d’être un très bon ami ainsi qu’un véritable salut dans le ciel de Verdun. Par exemple, lorsqu’il apprit que son ami Navarre (surnommé ”la sentinelle de Verdun”) avait été abattu et grièvement blessé le 17 juin 1916, il décolla immédiatement. Seul, il se rendit sur les lieux où son ami avait été abattu et fonça sur un LVG C qu’il descendit sans tarder. Il devint si célèbre que son nom ou son portrait figurait sur des emballages de bonbons et des timbres parmi les plus grands as au temple de la renommée.

Maxime Lenoir totalisait plus d’une centaine de missions de guerre, ce qui était considérable à cette époque. Blessé à deux reprises en combat aérien, il continua à livrer des combats aériens. Il décolla le lendemain de la reprise du fort de Douaumont ravagé par la bataille. Il fût inscrit aux absents au soir du 25 octobre 1916 puis porté disparu et ce n’est que bien plus tard qu’il fût déclaré ”Mort pour la France”. On ne l’a cependant jamais retrouvé malgré de multiples recherches.

Malheureusement, voilà pourquoi l’histoire de l’aviation l’a oublié pendant presque un siècle. L’un des plus brillants pilotes avait disparu de l’histoire de la première guerre mondiale. Son souvenir subsistait tout de même dans quelques livres en anglais et Jacques Mortane, le journaliste français laissa plusieurs publications soulignant le rôle de Maxime Lenoir dans l’aviation et le combat aérien. Puis plus rien, on n’écrivit presque rien sur ce pilot qui fût décoré de la Légion d’honneur, de la Médaille militaire, la Croix de guerre, ainsi que lui furent attribué les prestigieuses médailles d’or de l’Aéroclub d’Amérique et de l’Aéroclub de France!

Deux hommes seulement, ont su conserver son souvenir intact. D’abord Abel Anjorand qui a toujours été un ami de longue date de la famille Lenoir. Il a compilé toute une série de documents et d’images pour laisser une trace de l’as du village à de futures générations. Didier Lecoq, journaliste et historien révèle depuis quelques années les exploits de Maxime Lenoir sur son site aeroplanedetouraine.fr . L’as de la première guerre mondiale aurait pu resté caché pendant peut-être encore quelques décennies de plus sans le magnifique travail de Didier Lecoq qui fait remarquer fort justement qu’aucun bâtiment, aucune place, aucune rue ne porte le nom de Maxime Lenoir.

Il y a enfin une bonne nouvelle puisque depuis l’été dernier, les responsables nationaux et régionaux reconnaissent officiellement Maxime Lenoir comme le héros de la Grande guerre pour la ville de Tours et l’Indre-et-Loire dans l’opération de commémoration ”100 villes, 100 héros, 100 drapeaux”. Une cérémonie pour rendre hommage au héros local s’est déroulée dans la capitale de Touraine, place Anatole France sur la rive gauche de la Loire le vendredi 19 septembre 2014. La famille Lenoir, leurs amis et des anciens combattants ont assisté à la cérémonie qui s’acheva dans la majestueuse salle des fêtes de l’hôtel de ville.

La disparition de Maxime Lenoir des manuels d’histoire pendant presque un siècle demeure un mystère. Ce qui est encore plus étrange, c’est que des fans d’aviation, des joueurs en ligne ainsi que des modélistes ont utilisé des symboles de Lenoir comme ”Trompe la mort III”, ”Max” et ”Backjumper” tirés pour certains de décalcomanies accompagnant le ”Vieux Charles” de Guynemer. Ce n’est pas étonnant que Lenoir retrouve sa place dans l’histoire de l’aviation car au moins deux livres évoquant l’ancien as doivent paraître entre 2015 et 2016 et fort justement. Parmi les 100 héros de la Grande guerre, il s’avère que Maxime arrive comme le 5ème as par le nombre de victoires sur un total de 21 aviateurs et il est dans cette liste le second as ”Mort pour la France” juste après… Guynemer !

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CLEMENT ADER MOVIE PROJECT

 

 

Clément Ader's Avion 3 at Salon Aéronautique 1909

Clément Ader’s Avion 3 at “Le Grand Palais” in Paris, France – 1909

 

What if aviation history had to be rewritten?

What if aviation history had to be rewritten?

Has Clément Ader had a lot of clout in aviation history? This is one of the questions and issues a brand new project will examine and try to answer.

Clément Ader – le film” (Clément Ader – the movie) project was born a few months ago thanks to a French team led by Sylvain Thomas – an aviation geek, with extensive experience in light aircraft videos, and as a former chief editor of an aviation magazine – and Thomas Leroux who has extensive experience as a TV channel director.

It all started by the idea of re-writing aviation history as far as Ader is concerned for the French engineer may not have revealed the whole of his activity. Some Satory archives were released in 1990 only. Besides, it has been clearly established that Clément Ader used to be bound by military secrecy, and it is believed that the inventor may have well hidden some of his projects. Besides, he happened to undervalue his performance. Was it any confession? Or odd attitude? Anyway, the plot lies in the first part of the film and consists of a fiction that reports earlier Ader’s flights that could have happened in the 1870s whereas the second part is a documentary developped by several aviation experts and historians. We cannot tell you more, of course.

The directors placed their idea on Ulule – a crowdfunding website, and they gathered enough money for starting up. They  have received considerable support from José Garcia, the French movie star – and pilot – and the actress and singer Véronique Jeannot who used to sponsor the Patrouille de France, and brought out the album “Aviateur” in 1988. The guest stars have sponsored “Rêves de gosse“, an association helping impaired children. More than a hundred other avgeeks gave their support in the crowdfunding, and the film is now on the making. Xavier Cotton (http://passiondesavions.blogspot.fr/) is one of them, and he has already helped Prepa PLS Anglais a lot with his photos, and given his expertise in the field of aeronautics.

Clément Ader – le film & Prepa PLS Anglais have spontaneously begun a partnership, helping each other as often as possible. It must be noted that both structures share the same interests, particularly by promoting aviation history, and even rewriting it. You will be kept posted sooner or later…

The team has already released a few quite interesting videos which deal with aeronautical issues in the broadest sense on their their Youtube channel in a French-speaking series called “Avianoob”. It is worth a visit, and may represent learning resource for BIA(Brevet d’Initiation Aéronautique) as well as CAEA (Certificat d’Aptitude à l’Enseignement Aéronautique) candidates.

Last, not the least, Sylvain and Thomas, to their credit, made the decision of donating part of the profits from DVD sales to “Rêves de gosse“.

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En français:

L'Eole de Clément Ader

L’Eole de Clément Ader

Peut-on dire que Clément Ader a beaucoup marqué l’histoire de l’aviation de son influence? C’est une des questions qu’un projet flambant neuf tentera d’élucider.

Le projet “Clément Ader – le film” a vu le jour il y a quelques mois grâce à une équipe menée par Sylvain Thomas (fan d’aviation avec une grande expérience sur le tournage de vidéos d’avions légers, il fût rédacteur-en-chef d’un magazine sur l’aviation) et Thomas Leroux qui a une grande expérience comme réalisateur d’une chaîne télévisée.

Tout a commencé avec l’idée de réécrire l’histoire de l’aviation en ce qui concerne Ader car il se peut que l’ingénieur français n’ait pas tout dévoilé de son activité. Des archives de Satory ne furent rendues publiques qu’en 1990. D’autre part, il a clairement été établi que jadis, Clément Ader était tenu au secret militaire et on croit qu’il se peut que certains projets de l’inventeur aient bien été cachés. Par ailleurs, il est arrivé qu’il minimise ses performances. Etait-ce un aveu? Ou une étrange attitude? Bref, l’histoire, dans la première partie du film consiste en une fiction selon laquelle des précédents vols d’Ader auraient pu avoir lieu dans les années 1870 tandis que la seconde partie est un documentaire développé par des experts de l’aviation et des historiens. Bien entendu, nous ne pouvons pas vous en dire plus.

Les réalisateurs on mis leur idée en ligne sur Ulule (un site de crowdfuning) et ils ont rassemblé suffisamment de fonds pour démarrer leur projet. Ils ont bénéficié d’un appui considérable de José Garcia, la star du cinéma et pilote d’aviation et de l’actrice chanteuse Véronique Jeannot qui avait été une marraine de la Patrouille de France et avait sorti l’album “Aviateur” en 1988. Les deux vedettes du petit et du grand écran ont parainné “Rêves de gosse“, une association qui aide les enfants en difficulté ou en situation de handicap. Une grosse centaine de pasionnés d’aviation ont apporté leur soutien lors du crowdfunding et la réalisation du film est en cours. L’un d’entre eux est Xavier Cotton (http://passiondesavions.blogspot.fr/) qui a déjà beaucoup aidé Prépa PLS Anglais avec ses photos et grâce à son expertise dans le domaine de l’aéronautique.

Clément Ader – le film et Prepa PLS Anglais ont spontanément démarré un partenariat dans une aide mutuelle aussi fréquente que possible. Il faut dire que les deux structures partagent les mêmes intérêts. Particulièrement en faisant la promotion de l’histoire de l’aviation et même en la réécrivant. Vous serez tenus informés tôt ou tard…

L’équipe a déjà réalisé quelques vidéos ô combien intéressantes qui traitent de questions sur l’aéronautique au sens très large sur leur chaîne Youtube dans une rubrique intitulée “Avianoob”. Elle vaut le détour et peut représenter une aide pédagogique pour les candidats au BIA(Brevet d’Initiation Aéronautique) voire au CAEA (Certificat d’Aptitude à l’Enseignement Aéronautique).

Dernier point et pas le moindre, Sylvain et Thomas ont pris la décision de reverser une partie de leurs bénéfices des ventes de DVD et c’est tout à leur honneur, en faveur de l’association “Rêves de gosse“.

Source des images:

 

Clément Ader flying

Clément Ader flying

Bande annonce:

 

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ER 2/33 SAVOIE – AMONG OLDEST SQUADRONS

December 1, 2012

 

Mirage F1CR Upside down - ER 02/033 "Savoy", SAL 6 "Rhine Gull" - Recce from 1912 till 2012

Mirage F1CR Upside down         –         ER 02/033 “Savoy”, SAL 6 “Rhine Gull”       –       Recce from 1912 till 2012

 

The French Air Force 2/33 “Savoie” Reconnaissance Squadron celebrated its centenary on June 22, 2012.

The centennial was presided over by General de Rousiers, a former 2/33 pilot in the 1980s, who is now the permanent Chairman of the European Union Military Committee (CEUMC).

This ceremony was held at BA 118 FAF Station in Mont de Marsan, in the southwest of France. It was more particularly dedicated to its oldest flight (escadrille in French) – SAL 6, which means Salmson aircraft, and 6 as the sixth flight created in the French Army Aviation.

This creation occurred in December 1912, but traces of its previous existence might be found as early as September 1912, and maybe earlier. I will keep you posted if necessary.

The centennial had begun earlier on Friday 22nd of June in the morning with the presentation of the Rhine Gull insignia to the new SAL 6 Flight members.

Some of the senior members invited – all veterans – could see that their traditions were kept up at a high level as the candidates had to go through various “ordeals” to deserve their brand new badges.

The SAL 6 flight’s emblem consists of a white bird, a Rhine gull clad with a blue circle as shown hereafter:

 

ER 2/33 Savoie reconnaissance squadron, SAL 6 "Rhine Gull" Flight Emblem

ER 2/33 Savoie Recce Squadron, SAL 6 “Rhine Gull” Emblem

 

ER 2/33 Savoie recce squadron, SAL 6 "Rhine Gull" Flight Emblem

ER 2/33 Savoie, SAL 6 “Rhine Gull” Emblem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is assumed that the origins of the SAL 6 flight emblem date back to 1920.

 

Mirage F1CR and previous ER 2/33 SAL 6 aircraft

Mirage F1CR and previous ER 2/33 SAL 6 aircraft

 

 

Mirage F1CR starboard and previous ER 2/33 SAL 6 aircraft

Mirage F1CR starboard and previous ER 2/33 SAL 6 aircraft

SAL 6 was disbanded for almost a year in Germany from April 10, 1919.

The flight was created anew in Germany into the 16th flight of the 33rd Aerial Observation Regiment (33eme RAO). That new flight would have kept the SAL 6, C 6, and D6 traditions since the calling SAL 6 remained along with 16th flight (16ème escadrille) for that decade. However, it would have had a new batch of pilots, mechanics, and aircraft.

Mirage F1CR - ER 02/033 Savoie, Escadrille SAL 6 "Mouette du Rhin" en extrados de dessus - 100eme anniversaire

Mirage F1CR – Recce Squadron ER 02/033 “Savoy”, Flight SAL 6 “Rhine gull” – 100th anniversary

Among those aircraft, there would have been a SAL 70 flight aircraft – a Salmson 2A2 – on which the SAL 70 emblem was painted. It was a white gull with a blue disk on its background.

There were many Rhine gulls flying around where SAL 6 stationed from 1920 until 1930 (Gossenheim; Krefeld; and Bochum), and blue was the color of reconnaissance.

As SAL 6 had to remain in the Rhineland area, and its main mission consisted in performing reconnaissance missions, that SAL 70 Salmson aircraft turned out to be a timely addition.

It was therefore decided to take the SAL 70 symbol to be slightly changed into a Rhine gull surrounded by a blue circle.

In the early years, the first SAL6 Flight marking would have looked like this one below, and it may have featured an Egyptian Eagle:

 

Original ER 2/33 Savoie D6, C6, and SAL6 Aircraft Marking

Original D6, C6, and SAL6 Aircraft Marking

 

Mirage F1CR above clouds - ER 02/033 "Savoie", SAL 6 "Mouette du Rhin" - "100 ans de Reco" !

Mirage F1CR above clouds – ER 02/033 “Savoie”, SAL 6 “Mouette du Rhin” – “100 ans de Reco” !

 

Mirage F1CR fin - 02033 SAVOIE Recce Sqn

Mirage F1CR fin – 02033 SAVOIE Recce Sqn

General Charles de Gaule, who was in exile in the United Kingdom, named Colonel Valin as Commander-in-Chief of the Free French Air Force (FAFL – Forces Aériennes Françaises Libres) during the Second World War.

The aviator made a decision of giving its squadrons a French region name for each of them in order to address a strong message to the Vichy regime which collaborated with Hitler, and the Axis powers.

As a consequence, the Reconnaissance Group GR 2/33 was named Savoie on the 3rd of November 1943, and it has kept this name so far.

This is why you can see the Savoy’s flag on various SAL 6 aircraft. ER 2/33 was stationed near Strasbourg between 1960 and 1994. This is why the Savoy’s red flag covered with the white Saint John’s Cross (Croix de St Jean) was painted on a huge concrete slab, on a patch of lawn, in the middle of the squadron area, close to the 2/33 photo hangar at Strasbourg-Entzheim FAF Station. This is why this flag has been billowing above the new squadron facilities since early 2012. This is also why an official twinning was organized between this squadron, and the General Council of Savoie.
As I started to look up through various sources on squadrons & flights history, it turned out that SAL 6 Rhine Gull Flight is a very old unit. Probably one of the oldest  in the world.

According to the chart here below, ER 02033 Savoie, and more particularly SAL 6 Rhine Gull would be the third oldest reconnaissance squadron or flight in the world as of late 2012:

 

Rank.

NAME

From

ROLE

SQUADRON
(December 2012)

COUNTRY
Current station

1 ?

SAL 1

Mar 29

1912

Electronic Warfare
Flight

EEA 54 Dunkerque

FRANCE,
Evreux

2 ?

No 1

?

1878

Balloon Company

No 1 RAF

UK, Cottesmore
(N°1 RAF
should reform
in late 2012)

May 13

1912

Royal Flying Corps

Aug ?

1914

Heavier than air
Reconnaissance &
Fighter Squadron

3 ?

No 2

May 13

1912

Reconnaissance Sqn

No 2 RAF

UK, Marham

3 ?

No 3

May 13

Fighter Squadron

No 3 RAF

UK, Coningsby

5

SPA 3

Jun ?

Fighter Flight
(Guynemer’s flight)

EC 1/2 Cigognes

FRANCE, Dijon

6

BR 104

Jul ?

Transport Flight

ET 2/61
Franche Comte

FRANCE,
Orleans

7 ?

No 4

Aug ?

1912

Fighter Training Sqn

No 4 RAF

UK, Wittering

7 ?

SPA 15

Aug 22

Fighter Flight

EC 1/7 Provence

FRANCE,
Saint Dizier

9 ?

SAL 6

Dec ?

1912

Reconnaissance Flight

ER 2/33 Savoie

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

9 ?

SAL 8

Dec 10

Transport Flight

ETL 1/62 Vercors

FRANCE, Creil

11 ?

BR 11

Feb ?

1913

Reconnaissance Flight

ER 2/33 Savoie

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

11?

SAL 14

?

1913

Transport Flight

ET 1/64 Bearn

FRANCE,
Evreux

13 ?

SPA 103

Feb 16

Fighter Flight

EC 1/2 Cigognes

FRANCE, Dijon

13 ?

SAL 17

Feb 16

Helicopter Flight

EH 1/67 Pyrenees

FRANCE,
Cazaux

15 ?

1 RS

Mar 5

Reconnaissance Sqn

1 RS

USA, Beale,
California

16 ?

CFS

Mar ?

Training Unit

CFS

AUSTRALIA,
East Sale

17 ?

1 Sqn

Apr 16

1913

Fighter Flight

2 Wing Tactique

BELGIUM,
Florennes

18 ?

SAL 18

?

Transport Flight

ET 1/64 Bearn

FRANCE,
Evreux

18 ?

SAL 19

May ?

Transport Flight

ET 2/61
Franche Comte

FRANCE,
Orleans

18 ?

VB 101

?

Transport Flight

ET 1/61 Touraine

FRANCE,
Orleans

21 ?

No 5

Jul 26

Reconnaissance Sqn

No 5 RAF

UK, Waddington

22 ?

SPA BI 20
or MF 20

Dec ?

1913

Electronic Warfare
Flight

EEA 54 Dunkerque

FRANCE,
Evreux

23

No 6

Jan 31

1914

Fighter Squadron

No 6 RAF

UK, Leuchars

24

No 7

May 1

1914

Fighter Squadron

No 7 RAF

UK, Odiham

25 ?

SAL 22

Jun 6

Air Refuelling Flight

GRV 93 Bretagne

FRANCE, Istres

26 ?

SPA 69

Jun ?

Fighter Flight

EC 3/11 Corse

FRANCE,
Republic of
Djibouti

27

SPA 26

Aug 26

Fighter Flight

EC 1/2 Cigognes

FRANCE, Dijon

28

SAL 28

Sep 1

Fighter Flight

EC 1/91 Gascogne

FRANCE,
Saint Dizier

28

No 203

Sep 1

1914

Helicopter OCU

No 203 RAF

UK, Valley

30

SPA 31

Sep 24

Fighter Training Flight

ETD 2/7 Argonne

FRANCE,
Nancy

31

SAL 33

Oct 2

Reconnaissance Flight

ED 1/33 Belfort
Drone Squadron

FRANCE,
Cognac

32

No 202

Oct 17

SAR Squadron

No 202 RAF

UK, Valley

33

SPA 102

Nov 16

Fighter Flight

EC 2/3 Champagne

FRANCE,
Nancy

34

No 9

Dec 8

1914

Fighter Squadron

No 9 RAF

UK, Marham

35

No 8

Jan 1

1915

AEW Squadron

No 8 RAF

UK, Waddington

36

SPA 38

Jan 8

1915

Fighter Flight

EC 3/30 Lorraine

FRANCE,
Al Dhafra, UAE

37

No 13

Jan 10

Fighter Squadron

No 13 RAF

UK, Marham

38 ?

No 17

Feb 1

Fighter Squadron

No 17 RAF

UK, Coningsby

39 ?

No 14

Feb 3

ISTAR Squadron

No 14 RAF

UK, Waddington

40 ?

No 11

Feb 14

1915

Fighter Squadron

No 11 RAF

UK, Coningsby

40 ?

No 12

Feb 14

Fighter Squadron

No 12 RAF

UK, Lossiemouth

42 ?

SPA 99

Feb ?

Helicopter Flight

EH 3/67 Parisis

FRANCE,
Villacoublay

43 ?

No 15

Mar 1

Fighter Squadron

No 15 RAF

UK, Lossiemouth

44 ?

SPA BI 55

Mar 3

Transport Flight

ETL 1/62 Vercors

FRANCE, Creil

45 ?

SPA 88

Mar ?

1915

Fighter Flight

EC 3/11 Corse

FRANCE,
Republic of
Djibouti

45 ?

SPA 97

Mar ?

Fighter Flight

EC 2/30
Normandie-Niemen

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

47 ?

No 30

Mar 24

Transport Squadron

No 30 RAF

UK, Brize Norton

48 ?

SPA 48

Mar 29

Fighter Training Flight

ETD 2/7 Argonne

FRANCE,
Nancy

49 ?

BR 44

Apr 4

Fighter Flight

EC 3/3 Ardennes

FRANCE,
Nancy

50 ?

BR 113

Apr ?

1915

Transport Flight

ET 1/61 Touraine

FRANCE,
Orleans

51 ?

102 RQS

?

1908

Balloon Company

1st Aero Company

USA,
Westhampton
Beach, New York

May ?

1915

Heavier than air
Rescue Sqn

102nd Rescue Sqn

51 ?

SPA 95

May 1

1915

Fighter Flight

EC 1/3 Navarre

FRANCE,
Nancy

53 ?

C 53 or
SPA BI 53

May 2

1915

Reconnaissance Flight

ER 2/33 Savoie

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

53 ?

SAL 56

May 2

Fighter Flight

EC 3/30 Lorraine

FRANCE,
Al Dhafra, UAE

55 ?

SPA BI 54

May 7

Air Refuelling Flight

GRV 93 Bretagne

FRANCE, Istres

56 ?

SPA 57

May 11

Fighter Training Flight

EE 5/2 Cote d’or

FRANCE, Dijon

56 ?

No 18

May 11

SAR Squadron

No 18 RAF

UK, Odiham

58 ?

2 ARS

May 12

Air Refuelling Sqn

2 ARS

USA, McGuire
-Dix-Lakehurst,
New Jersey

59 ?

SAL 58

May 20

1915

AEW Flight

36th EDCA

FRANCE,
Avord

60

SPA 96

Jun 1

Fighter Flight

EC 2/4 La Fayette

FRANCE, Istres

61

SPA 93

Jul/Sep?

Fighter Flight

EC 2/30
Normandie-Niemen

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

62

SPA 65

Aug 2

Fighter Training Flight

EE 5/2 Cote d’or

FRANCE, Dijon

63

SPA 62

Aug 11
Apr 25?

Fighter Flight

EC 1/3 Navarre

FRANCE,
Nancy

64 ?

No 22

Sep 1

1915

SAR Squadron

No 22 RAF

UK, Valley

65 ?

SPA 67

Sep 17

Fighter Flight

EC 2/3 Champagne

FRANCE,
Nancy

66 ?

F 118

Sep ?

Transport Flight

ET 3/61 Poitou

FRANCE,
Orleans

66 ?

F 119

Sep ?

Transport Flight

ET 3/61 Poitou

FRANCE,
Orleans

68

No 24

Sep 21

Transport Squadron

No 24 RAF

UK, Brize Norton

69

No 31

Oct 11

1915

Fighter Squadron

No 31 RAF

UK, Marham

70

SPA 91

Oct 13

Fighter Flight

EC 2/30
Normandie-Niemen

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

71

BR 66

Oct 24

Fighter Flight

EC 1/91 Gascogne

FRANCE,
Saint Dizier

72

No 27

Sep 21

Helicopter Squadron

No 27 RAF

UK, Odiham

73

No 28

Nov 7

Helicopter Squadron

No 28 RAF

UK, Benson

73

No 29

Nov 7

1915

OCU

No 29 RAF

UK, Coningsby

75

No 1 (AFC)

Jan 1

1916

Fighter Squadron

No 1 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Amberley

76

No 32

Jan 12

VIP Transport Sqn
“The Royal Squadron”

No 32 RAF

UK, Northolt

76

No 33

Jan 12

Helicopter Squadron

No 33 RAF

UK, Benson

78

BR 228

Feb 1

Electronic Warfare
Flight

EEA 54 Dunkerque

FRANCE,
Evreux

79

BR 216

Feb 16

1916

Transport Flight

ETOM 82 Maine

France, Tahiti

80

No 45

Mar 1

Training Squadron

No 45 RAF

UK, Cranwell

80

No 47

Mar 1

Transport Flight

No 47 RAF

UK, Brize Norton

82

N 124

Apr 9

Fighter Flight

EC 2/4
La Fayette Escadrille
U.S. 103rd Aero Sqn

FRANCE, Istres

83

No 39

Apr 15

1916

Drone Squadron

No 39 RAF

UK,
Creech, USA

84

SPA 73

Apr 19

Fighter Training Flight

ETO 2 Nice

FRANCE,
Cazaux

85

No 55

Apr 27

Training Squadron

No 55 RAF

UK, Cranwell

86

No 60

Apr 30

Helicopter Training Sqn

No 60 RAF

UK, Shawbury

87

No 54

May 5

1916

ISR Sqn & OCU

No 54 RAF

UK, Waddington

88

No 51

May 15

SIGINT Squadron

No 51 RAF

UK, Waddington

89

No 56

Jun 8

OEU

No 56 RAF

UK, Waddington

90

SPA 75

Jul 13

Fighter Flight

EC 2/3 Champagne

FRANCE,
Nancy

91

No 41

Jul 14

1916

Test & Evaluation Sqn

No 41 RAF

UK, Coningsby

92

Jasta 2

Aug 10

Fighter Squadron

Jagdstaffel 2
(Red Baron Sqn)

GERMAN Empire
Bertincourt, France

93

Jasta 4

Aug 25

Fighter Squadron

Jagdstaffel 4
(Ernst Udet Sqn)

GERMAN Empire
Vaux, France

94 ?

No 2 (AFC)

Sep ?

AEW Squadron

No 2 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Williamtown

95 ?

SPA 77

Sep 19

1916

Fighter Flight

EC 1/7 Provence

FRANCE,
Saint Dizier

95 ?

No 3 (AFC)

Sep 19

Fighter Squadron

No 3 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Williamtown

97 ?

Jasta 11

Sep 28

Fighter Squadron

Jagdstaffel 11
“Flying Circus”
(Red Baron Sqn)

GERMAN Empire
Douai, France

98

No 4 (AFC)

Oct 16

FACDU Squadron

No 4 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Williamtown

99

No 208

Oct 26

1916

Fighter Training Sqn

No 208 RAF

UK, Valley

100

3 FTS

Nov 1

Fighter Training Sqn

3 FTS

USA, Vance

100

No 78

Nov 1

Helicopter Squadron

No 78 RAF

UK, Benson

102

SPA 79

Nov 21

Fighter Flight

EC 1/91 Gascogne

FRANCE,
Saint Dizier

103

SPA 78

Dec 12

Fighter Training Flight

ETO 2 Nice

FRANCE,
Cazaux

104

SPA 81

Dec 26

1916

Fighter Flight

EC 2/4 La Fayette

FRANCE, Istres

105

No 84

Jan 7

1917

SAR Squadron

No 84 RAF

UK,
Akrotiri, Cyprus

106

No 100

Feb 23

1917

Fighter Training Sqn

No 100 RAF

UK, Leeming

107

BR 131

Jun 2

Transport Flight

ET 2/64 Anjou

FRANCE,
Evreux

107

12 RS

Jun 2

Reconnaissance Sqn

12th Recce Sqn

USA, Beale,
California

109

119 FS

Jun 5

Fighter Squadron

119th Fighter Sqn

USA,
Atlantic City,
New Jersey

110

34 BS

Jun 11

Bomb Squadron

34th Bomb Squadron

USA, Ellsworth

111

35 FS

Jun 12

1917

Fighter Squadron

35th Fighter Squadron

USA,
Kunsan, S. Korea

111

36 FS

Jun 12

Fighter Squadron

36th Fighter Squadron

USA,
Osan, S. Korea

113

9 BS

Jun 14

Bomb Squadron

9th Bomb Squadron

USA, Dyess

114

No 6 (AFC)

Jun 15

Fighter Training Sqn

No 6 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Amberley

114

27 FS

Jun 15

Fighter Squadron

27th Fighter Squadron
“Fighting Eagles”

USA, Langley,
Virginia

116 ?

BR 132

Jun ?

1917

Transport Flight

ET 2/64 Anjou

FRANCE,
Evreux

117

23 BS

Jun 16

Bomb Squadron

23rd Bomb Sqn

USA, Minot,
North Dakota

118

JG 1

Jun 24

Fighter Sqn/Group

Jagdgeschwader 1
(Red Baron Sqn)

GERMAN Empire
Douai (France)

119

11 BS

Jun 26

Bomb Squadron

11th Bomb Sqn

USA, Barksdale,
Louisiana

119

20 BS

Jun 26

Bomb Squadron

20th Bomb Sqn

USA, Barksdale,
Louisiana

121

No 72

Jun 28

1917

Training Squadron

No 72 RAF

UK,
Linton-on-Ouse

122

No 101

Jul 12

Air Refuelling Sqn

No 101 RAF

UK, Brize Norton

123

SPA 153

Jul 1

Fighter Flight

EC 1/3 Navarre

FRANCE,
Nancy

124

SPA 152

Jul 9

Helicopter Flight

EHOM 68 Guyane

FRANCE,
French Guyana,
Rochambeau

124

SPA 162

Jul 9

1917

Fighter Flight

EC 1/7 Provence

FRANCE,
Saint Dizier

Jan 28

1918

126

55 FS

Aug 9

1917

Fighter Squadron

55th Fighter Squadron

USA, Shaw,
South Carolina

127

77 AS

Aug 13

1917

77 Aero Service Sqn,
predecessor to the current 77 FS
+ 2 Other Squadrons

Now 489th RS
Reconnaissance Sqn
& 77th Fighter Sqn
(Former Squadron A)

USA, Beale,
California
& USA, Shaw,
South Carolina

Feb 20

1918

128

110 BS

Aug 14

1917

Bomb Squadron

110th Bomb Squadron

USA, Whiteman,
Missouri

129

No 99

Aug 15

1917

Transport Squadron

No 99 RAF

UK, Brize Norton

130

112 FS

Aug 18

Fighter Squadron

112th Fighter Sqn

USA,
Toledo, Ohio

131

94 FS

Aug 20

Fighter Squadron

94th Fighter Squadron
“Hat in the Ring”

USA, Langley,
Virginia

132

96 BS

Bomb Squadron

96th Bomb Squadron

USA, Barksdale,
Louisiana

133

93 BS

Aug 21

1917

Bomb Squadron

93rd Bomb Squadron

USA, Barksdale,
Louisiana

134

99 RS

Reconnaissance Sqn

99th Recce Squadron

USA, Beale,
California

135

120 FS

Aug 28

Fighter Squadron

120th Fighter Sqn
“Colorado Cougars”

USA,
Buckley AFB,
Aurora, Colorado

136

No 216

Oct 5

Air Refuelling Sqn

No 216 RAF

UK, Brize Norton

137

SAL 253

Nov 18?

1917

AEW Flight

36th EDCA

FRANCE,
Avord

138

BR 257

Jan 1

1918

AEW Flight

36th EDCA

FRANCE,
Avord

Apr 8

1915?

139

79 FS

Feb 22

1918

Fighter Squadron

79th Fighter Squadron
“Tigers”

USA, Shaw,
South Carolina

140

BR 237

Mar 16

1918

Transport Flight

ETOM 82 Maine

FRANCE, Tahiti

Feb 17

1916?

141

SPA 163

Apr 4

1918

Fighter &
Experimentation Flight

EC 5/330
Cote d’argent

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

May 6

142

No 230

Aug 20

1918

Helicopter Squadron

No 230 RAF

UK, Benson

143

SPA 167

Aug 22

1918

Fighter Flight

EC 2/4 La Fayette

FRANCE, Istres

Jan 1 ?

144

SPA 164

Sep 18

1918

Fighter &
Experimentation Flight

EC 5/330
Cote d’argent

FRANCE,
Mont de Marsan

145

VR 291

Nov 5

1918

Reconnaissance Flight

ED 1/33 Belfort
Drone Squadron

FRANCE,
Cognac

Inact.

7. EL

Nov 7

1918

Fighter Flight

7. Eskadra Lotnicza
Kościuszko Sqn

POLAND, Lviv

146

VFA-14

Sep ?

1919

Fighter Squadron

Strike Fighter Sqn 14
“Tophatters”

USA, Lemoore,
California

Inact.

1st KD

May ?

1920

Air Battalion

1st Koku Daitai

JAPANESE
Empire

147

VMFA-232

Sep 1

1925

Marine Fighter Sqn

The “Red Devils”

USA, Miramar,
California

148 ?

No 3

?

1930

Helicopter Squadron

No 3 RNZAF

NEW ZEALAND,
Ohakea

149 ?

VP-46

Jul 1

1931

Patrol Squadron

Patrol Squadron 46

USA,
Whidbey Island

150 ?

CFS

?

1932

Transport Squadron

Central Flying School
SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Langebaanweg

151 ?

No 400

Oct 5

1932

Helicopter Squadron

No 400 RCAF

CANADA,
Borden

No 402

Transport/Training Sqn

No 402 RCAF

CANADA,
Winnipeg

153 ?

No 1 Sqn

Apr 1

1933

Fighter Squadron

No. 1 Squadron
(The Tigers)

INDIA, Gwalior

154 ?

121 FS

?

1930s

Fighter Squadron

121st Fighter Sqn
“Guardians”

USA, Andrews,
Maryland

155 ?

68 AS

?

1936

Air School

68 Air School SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Pretoria

156 ?

2 Sqn

Jan ?

1939

Fighter Squadron

2 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Makhado

157 ?

No 10

Jul 1

1939

Maritime Patrol Sqn

No 10 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Point Cook

158 ?

15 Sqn

Sep 1

1939

Helicopter Squadron

15 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Port Elizabeth

17 Sqn

VIP Transport Sqn

17 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Waterkloof

19 Sqn

Helicopter Squadron

19 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Hoedspruit

161 ?

16 Sqn

Sep 14

1939

Helicopter Squadron

16 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Bloemspruit

162 ?

No 11

Sep 25

Maritime Patrol Sqn

No 11 RAAF

AUSTRALIA,
Edinburgh

163

18 AS

Dec 22

1939

Aggressor Squadron

18th AGRS

USA, Eielson,
Alaska

164

123 FS

Jul 30

1940

Fighter Squadron

123rd Fighter Sqn
“Redhawks”

USA, Portland,
Oregon

165

41 Sqn

Oct 16

1940

Transport Squadron

41 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Waterkloof

166

64 AS

Nov 20

1940

Aggressor Squadron

64th AGRS

USA, Nellis,
Nevada

65 AS

Aggressor Squadron

65th AGRS

USA, Nellis,
Nevada

69 BS

Bomb Squadron

69th Bomb Squadron

USA, Minot,
North Dakota

169

60 Sqn

Dec ?

1940

Transport Squadron

60 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Waterkloof

125 FS

Fighter Squadron

125th Fighter Sqn
“Tulsa Vipers”

USA, Tulsa,
Oklahoma

171

44 FS

Jan 1

1941

Fighter Squadron

44th Fighter Squadron
“Vampires”

USA, Kadena,
Japan

172 ?

960 AACS

Jan 15

1941

AC&C Squradron

960th Airborne Air
Control Squadron

USA, Tinker,
Oklahoma

4 FS

Fighter Squadron

4th Fighter Squadron
“Fightin’ Fuujins”

USA, Hill, Utah

7 FS

Fighter Squadron

7th Fighter Squadron
“Bunyips”

USA, Holloman,
New Mexico

61 FS

Jan 15

1941

Fighter Squadron

61st Fighter Squadron
“Top Dogs”

USA, Luke,
Arizona

62 FS

Fighter Squadron

62nd Fighter Sqn

USA, Luke,
Arizona

63 FS

Fighter Squadron

63rd Fighter Squadron

USA, Luke,
Arizona

64 FS

Fighter Squadron

64th Fighter Squadron
“Fighting Cocks”

USA, Kadena,
Japan

179 ?

No 403

Mar 1

1941

Helicopter OTS

No 403 RCAF

CANADA,
Gagetown

180 ?

No 404

Apr 15

1941

LRP&T Sqn

No 404 RCAF

CANADA,
Greenwood

181 ?

No 405

Apr 23

1941

LRP Sqn

No 405 RCAF

CANADA,
Greenwood

182 ?

No 406

May 5

1941

Maritime OTS

No 406 RCAF

CANADA,
Shearwater

183 ?

21 Sqn

May 8

1941

VIP Transport Sqn

21 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Waterkloof

No 407

LRP Sqn

No 407 RCAF

CANADA,
Comox

185 ?

No 408

Jun 24

1941

Helicopter Squadron

No 408 RCAF

CANADA,
Edmonton

186 ?

No 409

Jun ?

1941

Fighter Squadron

No 409 RCAF

CANADA,
Cold Lake

No 410

Fighter Training Sqn

No 410 RCAF
(“Jetstream” series)

CANADA,
Cold Lake

188 ?

No 412

Jun 30

1941

VIP Transport Sqn

No 412 RCAF

CANADA,
Trenton

189 ?

No 413

Jul ?

1941

Transport/Rescue Sqn

No 413 RCAF

CANADA,
Greenwood

190 ?

No 5

Nov ?

Maritime Patrol Sqn

No 5 RNZAF

NEW ZEALAND,
Republic of Fiji

191 ?

No 417

Nov 27

Helicopter Squadron

No 417 RCAF

CANADA,
Cold Lake

192 ?

No 419

?

1941

Fighter Training Sqn

No 419 RCAF

CANADA,
Cold Lake

193

80 FS

Jan 6

1942

Fighter Squadron

80th Fighter Squadron
“Headhunters / Juvats”

USA,
Misawa, Japan

194

13 FS

Jan 13

1942

Fighter Squadron

13th Fighter Squadron
“The Panther Pack”

USA,
Kunsan, S. Korea

195

81 FS

Jan 15

Fighter Squadron

81st Fighter Squadron

USA,
Spangdahlem, Germany

196

134 FS

Jan 28

Fighter Squadron

134th Fighter Sqn
“The Green
Mountain Boys”

USA,
Burlington,
Vermont

343 BS

Jan 28

Bomb Squadron

343rd Bomb Sqn

USA, Barksdale,
Louisiana

198 ?

No 6

Feb ?

1942

Helicopter Squadron

No 6 RNZAF

NEW ZEALAND,
RNZ Navy

199 ?

100 FS

Feb 19

Fighter Squadron

100th Fighter Sqn
Tuskegee airmen Sqn

USA,
Montgomery,
Alabama

200

No 423

May 18

Helicopter Squadron

No 423 RCAF

CANADA,
Shearwater

201

14 FS

Jun 20

Fighter Squadron

14th Fighter Squadron
“Fightin’ Samurai”

USA,
Misawa, Japan

13 RS

Reconnaissance Sqn

13th Recce Squadron

USA, Beale,
California

203

No 425

Jun 22

Fighter Squadron

No 425 RCAF

CANADA,
Bagotville

204

VMA-214

Jul 1

1942

Fighter Squadron
Marine Attack Sqn

Pappy Boyington’s
“Black Sheep” Sqn

USA, Yuma,
Arizona

22 Sqn

Helicopter Squadron

22 Squadron SAAF

SOUTH AFRICA,
Ysterplaat

206

176 FS

Jul 16

1942

Fighter Squadron

176th Fighter Sqn
“Badger Air Militia”

USA,
Madison,
Wisconsin

207

131 FS

Aug 18

1942

Fighter Squadron

131st Fighter Sqn
“Barnestormers”

USA,
Barnes,
Massachussetts

208

159 FS

Sep 30

1942

Fighter Squadron

159th Fighter Sqn

USA,
Jacksonville,
Florida

209

148 FS

Oct 1

1942

Fighter Squadron

148th Fighter Sqn
“Kickin’ ass”

USA,
Tucson, Arizona

210

No 424

Oct 15

1942

Transport/Rescue Sqn

No 424 RCAF

CANADA,
Trenton

No 426

Transport training Sqn

No 426 RCAF

CANADA,
Trenton

212

No 427

Nov 7

1942

SOAS

No 427 RCAF

CANADA,
Petawawa

213

162 FS

Dec ?

1942

Fighter Squadron

162nd Fighter Sqn

USA,
Springfield-
Beckley, Ohio

214

188 FS

Jan 25

1943

Fighter Squadron

188th Fighter Sqn
“Enchilada Air Force”
“The Tacos”

USA, Kirtland,
Albuquerque,
New Mexico

215

No 617

Mar 21

1943

Fighter Squadron

No 617 RAF
“The Dambusters”

UK, Lossiemouth

216

175 FS

Apr 27

1943

Fighter Squadron

175th Fighter Sqn
“Fightin’ Lobos”

USA,
Sioux Falls,
South Dakota

217

182 FS

May 24

1943

Fighter Squadron

182nd Fighter Sqn
“Lonestar Gunfighters”

USA, Lackland,
San Antonio, Texas

218

186 FS

May 25

Fighter Squadron

186th Fighter Sqn
“Charlie Chickens”

USA, Great Falls,
Montana

219

179 FS

May 26

Fighter Squadron

179th Fighter Sqn
“Bulldogs”

USA,
Duluth, Minnesota

220

No 40

Jun 1

1943

Transport Squadron

No 40 RNZAF

NEW ZEALAND,
Auckland

93 FS

Fighter Squadron

93th Fighter Squadron
“Fighting Makos”

USA,
Homestead,
Florida

222

No 42

Dec ?

1943

VIP Transport Sqn

No 42 RNZAF

NEW ZEALAND,
Whenuapai

223

393 BS

Feb 28

1944

Bomb Squadron

393rd Bomb Sqn

USA, Whiteman,
Missouri

224

21 FS

Oct 15

1944

Fighter Squadron

21st Fighter Squadron
“Gamblers”

USA, Luke,
Arizona

225

157 FS

Feb 9?
Jun 30

1946

Fighter Squadron

157th Fighter Squadron
“Swamp Fox”

USA, McEntire,
South Carolina

226

124 FS

Oct ?

1948

Fighter Squadron

124th Fighter Sqn
“Hawkeyes”

USA,
Des Moines,
Iowa

170 FS

Oct ?

1948

Fighter Squadron

170th Fighter Sqn
“Fighting Illini”

USA,
Springfield,
Illinois

228

337 AS

May 10

1949

Transport Squadron

337th Airlift Squadron

USA, Westover,
Massachussetts

It has been very difficult to sort out these units in such a ranking as historians are still working on the military aviation history. It is hard to consider whether the administrative or material creation is taken into acount in some cases. For some flights or squadrons, you can find the administrative creation date only but you still find traces of pilots and aircraft’s existence of these very flights and squadrons after and even BEFORE the administrative creation!

Some other dates correspond to the day when units became operational. Moreover, mistakes have been pointed out in some books and website sources. It has become – since the beginning of this chart – that such charts should be updated. Last but not least, the Russian military aviation organization doesn’t match the western patterns, and coould not be inserted in these charts. That is to say that these charts cannot be exactly right… Sorry!

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WWI REMEMBRANCE DAY

 

WWI REMEMBRANCE DAY Flanders fields poem

Flanders Fields Poem, John McCrae – Photo © Wikipedia user: Lx_121

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
 Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly

 Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae (1872-1918) – Ypres battlefield 1915. Photo: Lx 121, Wikipedia courtesy

The War to End All Wars left 37,000,000 casualties – 16 million deaths and 21 million wounded. The Allies lost 5.7 million soldiers. May their souls rest in peace

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ROLLING HALLOWEEN !

THE ROLLING STONES - GRRR!

© Walton Ford – The Rolling Stones

I guessed it could be an appropriate single for this blog today as you can hear Mick Jagger singing “DOOM and GLOOM”, the latest hit of THE ROLLING STONES who still ROCK!

It’s a short story well appropriate indeed since it talks about a doomed airplane as you can read the lyrics on the video here below:

horror023hallo003

 


HAPPY HALLOWEEN !

 

 

Scary small pictures provided by Wikimedia, Scarce2

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LANDING – HOW DIFFICULT IT CAN BE…

 

WarningThis voice communication does not comply with the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) recommendations. However, you can click off, and listen without reading the script on this video in order to jot down this radio communication for listening training purpose:

 

Waterbury-Oxford Airport Map

Click on the map above to enlarge. (U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration courtesy via Wikimedia)

 

These things happen.

  1. Bearing reported with a ninety-degree error, then corrected;
  2. Uncertainty of the downwind leg;
  3. Traffic not in sight;
  4. Uncertainty as to which airport is in sight;
  5. Requests are said again;
  6. Another airport in the vicinity with same runway configuration;
  7. Traffic off course;
  8. Within half a mile, no traffic in sight, and no radar tracking;
  9. Pilot cannot hear at times or does not reply;
  10. Confusion between ident and squawk;
  11. Pilot does not know how to use the transponder;
  12. Uncertainty of the type of aircraft, then corrected.

Landings may be difficult at times, indeed…

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